Ask a doctor

Can't Figure out Cause of Milia

I have only recently begun to get several tiny milia under eyes and on eyelids. Can't see why? Using hypoallergenic cream on eye area, not new. Can they be removed by a dermatologist? And what can I use on my eye area? It's really horrifying to see. thanks

Doctor Answers (2)

Bumps around eyes such as milia

+2

It is important to see a board-certified dermatologist to ensure that your bumps are milia, which are tiny cysts. Bumps around the eyelids can be sweat gland growths, oil-gland growths and triglyceride deposits. All are different.


Manhattan Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Milia=Miniature Epidermal cysts

+1

Milia are miniature epidermal cysts (sometimes erroneously called sebaceous cysts). Sure they had some ambition but not the drive nor tenacity required  to become that  foul smelling, appearance ruining, disgusting cystic structures  we dermatologists and plastic surgeon have grown to hate. 

  IN babies and infants they are caused by the plugging up of immature follicles. They can occur following laser treatment or surgical excisions when healing skin seals off the opening which becomes engorged with keratin. Certain diseases such as porphyria cutanea tarda, pemphigus, epidermolysis bullosa, burns and radiation treatment.

 In your case, they may be caused by cosmetics. This is due to an irritation of the follicular orifices. Make sure yours are all non-comedogenic. 

  They can be simply extracted with an scalpel blade and forceps or comedone extractor. Sometimes, we prefer an electric needle. 

  As Dr. Shelton mentions, it is  good idea to have these checked out to rule out other such entities as syringomas ( sweat gland duct growths), sebaceous gland hyperplasias ( oil gland growths) and xanthelasmas ( cholesterol deposits).

Arnold R. Oppenheim, MD
Virginia Beach Dermatologist
4.5 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.