11 Year Old Implants: Sore, Headaches, Sleepy, Feverish

I Have Been Feeling Odd for 10 Days, Headaches, Sleepy, Feverish and Today I Noticed my today i noticed my left breast hurt, i took off my bra, and yikes it looks like i had implants yesterday, i did but 11 years ago. it is huge, swollen, sore and sore and body feels sick. any suggestions, e.r. tonight or wait to see my M.D. tomorrow am ?

Doctor Answers (4)

You should see your doctor ASAP.

+2

I'm sorry nobody has answered your question yet; by now you should have made a decision that things really do need an evaluation by your surgeon, or that this is not as dramatic as your symptoms seem.

I certainly sounds as if you havea bilateral breast infection, though 11 years post-op means this had to have occurred in the setting of some way for bacteria to enter the area around your implants. When I have seen this in patients like you, years after otherwise-uncomplicated implant surgery, it is in the setting of dental work after some sort of minor (and often unremembered) trauma to the breast or breasts that allowed the bacteria released into the bloodstream from the dental work to enter the space around the implant(s). Other plastic surgeons who do lots of breast surgery and see their patients regularly over the years can also attest to this potential cause, though we are certainly in the minority.

You may be having an unusually dramatic response to menstrual hormone shifts, but this isolated event after so many years argues against this as a cause. In the absence of trauma causing bilateral bleeding (this would account for "huge, swollen, and sore"), and adding that your "body feels sick," this should be considered infectious until proven otherwise.

In addition to breast examination, your doctor should draw blood tests to check your white blood cell count, the types of WBCs, and other possible indicators of infection. If infection around your implants seems likely, your surgeon will likely need to remove them to cure the infection, allow complete healing, and then replace them later. I would diligently try to identify the cause for this if in fact you have a 11-year post-op bilateral infection. Good luck, and let us know what you find out, not only for our own interest, but also for the benefit of other patients who are reading this.


Minneapolis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 135 reviews

Immediate breast swelling with implant and fevers.

+1

By the time you read this, you will (hopefully) have sought treatment. If it's during daytime hours, call your plastic surgeon, otherwise head to the ER. This is likely related to your implant, although other causes exist. Need to rule out the surgical cause first.

David Bogue, MD
Boca Raton Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Chronic breast implant infections

+1

You need to be seen by a plastic surgeon ASAP. If you see skin changes as well such as redness, warmth or blisters (especially if there is any drainage) you need to go to a hospital emergency room ASAP. This could be anything from an infection to ALCL. Either way there is a high likelihood that the implants will have to come out. The question then is do you need a course of antibiotics etc. before placing new implants. Depending on your insurance policy some of that care maybe coverable by your health insurance.

My response to your question/post does not represent formal medical advice or constitute a doctor patient relationship. You need to consult with i.e. personally see a board certified plastic surgeon in order to receive a formal evaluation and develop a doctor patient relationship.

Aaron Stone, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon

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Mastitis secondary to ???

+1

based on the time course I would not be surprised to find a problem with the implant. thromboplebitis of the breast and/or mastitis is also possible. so ER tonight with call to plastic surgeon in am.

Rafael C. Cabrera, MD
Boca Raton Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.