Was Fat Injected into Lacrimal Gland Causing Dry Eye?

Along with a bleph, my doc injected fat into my outer sub-brows. Had a bleph revision a year later where more fat was added in sub-brows. Now my left eye is constantly watering, looks like I'm crying out of one eye. I'm thinking fat was injected in my lacrimal gland - is this possible? If so, is this a dangerous condition or something to be seriously concerned about? What should I do for this and the dry eye? I'm really concerned! Thanks for your help.

Doctor Answers (4)

Dry eye

+1

You need to discuss your concerns with your doctor.

You also need a full opthalmologic workup for your dry eye.

Blepheroplasty can aggrevate dry eye syndrome.

Fat injection into the the lacrimal gland is unlikely, the gland is under the bone normally.

Blocking the tear ducts may be remotely, the ophthalmology consult will test for that.

Lid position is important.

Discuss with your doctor and ophthalmologist


Baltimore Plastic Surgeon

Eye Dryness after Blepharoplasty and Fat Injections

+1
Excessive tearing (Epiphora) and eyedryness CAN be seen after eyelid surgery without fat grafting. I have never heard of lacrimal gland injury due to fat grafting nor of it resulting if eye dryness. There are several mUCH more likely reason for this troublesome tearing / dryness and I suggest you see an ophthalmologist who would be able to isolate and hopefully reverse matters. Good Luck. Dr. Aldea

Peter A. Aldea, MD
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 63 reviews

Tearing after fat injections

+1
Epiphora would not be caused by fat injections into the gland. If however the fat blocked the tear duct in the lower inner eyelid then maybe tears would back up. See an aculoplastic surgeon if your situation doesn't improve.

Ronald Shelton, MD
Manhattan Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

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Constant tears (epiphora) following fat injection to upper eyelids

+1

It is not likely, that the fat itself could cause this problem if injected directly into lacrimal gland. It is more likely that you may be experiencing an entropion or some other form of ocular irritation prompting the epiphora (constant tearing). You should seek evaluation by an ophthalmologist to evaluate the cause of tearing.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 48 reviews

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