Second Failed Platysmaplasty What Can I Do Now?

I had my first failed platysmaplasty 1 year ago, my second was done 9 weeks ago(10 months after the first). I am a 47 yr old female,non smoker with decent skin elasticity. I do however have very prominent platysma bands. I am wondering if there is anything that can be done to impove my neck at this point. The first platysmplasty was done with under the chin and behind the ear incisions. The second was done with an under the chin incision only.Each done by 2 different doctors at the same practice

Doctor Answers (6)

2 failed platysmaplasties

+2

Sorry to hear of your experience

Having treated many such patients, I can tell you that you are not alone.

Open "carpet" suction on the surface of the muscle and careful preoperative marking of the band on the skin preoperatively, is important. The surgeon must clearly see the edge of the muscle at the time of surgery.

You will want to ask your surgeon if the muscle was resected or sutured together in what is commonly called a corset. Revisional surgery after resections are in my experience more difficult to treat.

There is no reason you can not have another attempt at correction of this problem. You do want a surgeon who has significant experience with corset platysmaplasty and revisional neck surgery.

Finally, if you had these procedures under local anesthesia with sedation, you might want to consider a general anesthetic. You want to give the next surgeon the greatest chance for assuring that it will be your last.


Gainesville Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

What do you consider a failed platysmaplasty?

+1

Knowing what you consider a failure is necessary because it defines what the goals were.  If you are markedly better then where you started from, this would not be considered a failure.  If you're expecting perfection and a neck that you did not have ever, this is an unrealistic goal and it is hoped your surgeon appreciated this before embarking on the recommended procedures.

There are many reasons for unsatisfactory results and your surgeon who was there should know best and formulate a plan to help you reach your goals.  Best wishes and don't despair as there are always procedures that can be done to improve upon your results.

Curtis Wong, MD
Redding Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Unsuccessful platysmaplasty

+1

At this point it's important to diagnose why you have the prominent band as that dictates the correct remedy. The typical causes are:

  1. Redundant (loose and excess) muscle
  2. Hyperactive (tense) muscle
  3. Scar tissue

Sam Naficy, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 137 reviews

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Second Failed Platysmaplasty What Can I Do Now?

+1

Sorry for your issues. But need posted photos to see the defect. Full incision of the bands can be accomplished by open neck/submental technique. 

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 61 reviews

Second Failed Platysmaplasty What Can I Do Now?

+1

The evaluation would be better with photos of your neck before and after the Neck Lift and revision procedure.  IMHO, you might want to get several second opinions at this point if for no other eeason but peace of mind.  I have performed Neck Lifts, for over 20 years, and IMHO patients should be able to get a pretty smooth, tight neck with a formal Neck Lift.

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Failed Surgery

+1

Without seeing pictures (before and after) or seeing you in person, it is impossible to comment specifically on what is going on in your case.  2 failed surgeries sounds very unusual and uncommon.  If you have vertical bands, then you may want to consider Botox injections into the bands.  Without further information, we really are limited in the advice that we can give.

 

Good Luck.

David Shafer, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 55 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.