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Facelift Scheduled in March. Is It Normal to Have Alot of Anxiety?I Have a Great Doctor....but the General Anesthesia Scares Me!

Facelift Scheduled in March. Is It Normal to Have Alot of Anxiety?I Have a Great Doctor....but the General Anesthesia Scares Me!

Doctor Answers (31)

It is normal to have anxiety before a Facelift

+3

Dear Kidhal,

It is very normal to have anxiety before a Facelift. It seems that the Facelift in particular causes patients the most concern. And like you most people have the most anxiety about General Anesthesia. THis is normal and understandable.

It is best to see your surgeon again for a pre operative consult and discussion. Express your concerns to your surgeon. It sounds like you have chosen a good one. A Plastic Surgeon who is Certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery and experienced in facelift will expect and understand your anxiety and should be able to re assure you.


Boston Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 29 reviews

Facelift anxiety is normal

+3

Nothing is as anxiety provoking as  as elective surgery. You are 100% normal and if you weren't concerned it would be abnormal.  Healthy concern and skepticism is a good thing.

It is likely your worry that led you to do your research and find a "great doctor".

It is the job of your board certified plastic surgeon to to explain the risks too you and to do his or her best to minimize them.

While general anesthesia is scary in perspective it is more likely that your local interstate is a more dangerous.

If you embark upon your surgery may I wish you a safe and speedy recovery.

 

Adam Tattelbaum, MD
Washington DC Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 48 reviews

Nervous about facelift

+2

 

it is normal to be nervous before a facelift or any surgery for that matter. general anesthesia scars many people but it shouldn't. I have always heard the anesthesiologists say that statistically the ride to the surgery center the day of the surgery is more dangerous than undergoing anesthesia (for a healthy patient). Eat a well-balanced diet and get plenty of exercise. That will help. You will get through it. Also, your surgeon might not have discussed this with you, but it is worth mentioning that some patients feel a little down for a month or two after a facelift. It is normal and if it happens be open with your doctor about it. I have never seen it be severe and patients always get through it. But it is a rarely discussed phenomenon that is worth knowing about in advance.

 

Adam Bryce Weinfeld, MD
Austin Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

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Facelift Anesthesia and Anxiety

+2

It is very natural to be apprehensive before any procedure, and, especially before a facelift. I usually tell my patients that I would send them to a Psychiatrist to find out what is wrong with them if they were not anxious. General anesthesia is, by far, the best and safest anesthesia for a Facelift when given by a certified anesthesiologist or anesthetist. It also reduces nausea from the anti-anxiety drugs you would need with a local anesthetic. With a great doctor you should do well.

 

Robert T. Buchanan, MD
Highlands Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Anesthesia for a facelift

+2

With a qualified anesthesia provider (a physician anesthesiologist is best IMO), and with a healthy patient, it is very safe to have a facelift under general anesthsia.  In fact, in my practice, all are done that way.

Richard P. Rand, MD, FACS
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 48 reviews

Anxiety Before Facelift

+2

It is normal to have anxiety before any operation, and may actually be worse when the surgery is an elective cosmetic procedure. Make sure that your anesthesia will be delivered by an anesthesiologist or certified nurse anesthetist. State of the art anesthetic drugs and techniques are available today.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

It is very common to feel nervous

+2

Hi Kidhal,

It is not uncommon to have anxiety prior to surgery. It is a natural reaction that causes many patients to feel nervous.   If you have chosen a Plastic Surgeon who is board certified and are having your surgery performed at an accredited facility then the risk of complication is very low.  I would recommend expressing your concerns to your doctor and anesthesiologist to help calm your anxiety. Best of luck!

Stewart Wang, MD, FACS
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 22 reviews

Anxiety about anesthestia for facelift.

+2

What you are describing is perfectly normal.  If you were not nervous you would be weird.  As long as you are going to an accredited facility and have board certified physicians taking care of you, the risks are low.  Statisically, you are safer in the O.R. than driving to the O.R. that day.  It is OK to ask to speak with the anestheliologist before the case.  This may reduce some of your anxiety.  It is also OK to call your plastic surgeon and talk to him about it as well. 

Jeffrey Roth, MD
Las Vegas Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Anxious about anesthesia for facelift surgery

+2

It not uncommon to be nervous about anethesia prior to surgery, including facelift. When performed by a qualified anesthesiologist or CRNA in an accredited operating room anesthesia is very safe. It may help if you could talk to your anesthesia provider prior to the procedure to help answer your concerns about having general anesthesia.

Thomas A. Lamperti, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Anxiety before face lift

+2

A certain level of anxiety is very common before any kind of elective surgery - especially on the face.  General is not always required for a face lift.  We perform ours under IV sedation and I do believe it is safer that way.

Sam Naficy, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 137 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.