Eyelid Surgery Revision Due to Ectropion?

six weeks ago, I had a double eyelift, and no ectropion. I have Ectropion in both eyes. It has been six weeks after my surgery. My doctor has suggested tape, up the eyes. He also stated if I need more surgery, he does not do the surgery I need.

Therefore, because he took out way too much skin I have to pay for another surgery? My left eye gaps open. I have lots of tears all day long. This has ruined the way I look, and I wish I had never had this surgery. Any suggestions?

Doctor Answers (8)

Ectropion treatment

+1

A mild degree of ectropion is not uncommon post operatively just from swelling, but should have resolved by now.  There are a number of ways to correct ectropion a, from simple techniques to the more elaborate.  Often, it results from removing too much skin. If this is the case, there is a simple way to "rebalance" the way the skin is tailored, thereby relieving the pulling forces on the lower lid.  Other techniques involve tightening the lower lid itself with either w wedge excision or a tarsal sling.  You need to see someone experienced in correcting the problem.  Make sure you see photos of their work


San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

See an oculoplastic surgeon for ectropion surgery

+1

See an oculoplastic surgeon who specializes in ectropion surgery. Many plastic surgeons do not perform canthopexy, canthoplasty surgery, and ectropion repair. At this point in time, hold your eyes closed, squint, and use your ocular muscles and tape them up as best you can at night. It is important to find an oculoplastic surgeon with many years of experience to refine and correct this situation.

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 55 reviews

Ectropion Can Be Corrected

+1

Ectropion is a known complication of lower eyelid blepharoplasty. As the incision starts healing the scar pulls and the weakest area is the eyelid which can get pulled downwards with time.

The good news is it can be fixed. You should look for an Oculoplastic Surgeon who does these routinely. Stay in touch with your ophthalmologist as well to make sure you do not get any eye infection in the interim.

Taping is helpful to fight the scar pulling it downwards. Get skin colored paper tape, clean the lower eyelids with soap and then (acetone) nail polish remover, dry it then apply the 1/2 inch wide tape from closer to the nose towards the ear but pulling it upwards. You must do this at least every night, if possible during the day. The skin colored tape is very forgiving in its appearance.

Massage the area frequently as well. Do not rub your eyes.

Make sure you have emotional support from friends and family during the stressful times.

You will get better, just hang in there and follow the above directions.

Regards

Tanveer Janjua, MD
Bedminster Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 25 reviews

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Ectropion After Blepharoplasty

+1

Hi Debbie,

Sorry to hearabout your poor result with blepharoplasty.

Consult with a board certified opthalmo-plastic surgeon who specializes in repairing ectropion. Unfortunately, it is between you and your surgeon as to whether you can be helped with the cost of the revision surgery.

Good luck and be well.

Dr. P

Michael A. Persky, MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

The "eyes" have it

+1

I am sorry to hear about your ordeal. Ectropion is a bothersome problem that produces constant tearing due to the abnormal position of your lower eyelid.

Ectropion can be addressed at many levels.

(1) The first thing to due is to tape your eyelids at night. This does not correct the ectropion but it does allow for complete closure of the lids at night to cover the sclera and cornea of the eyes. This prevents drying and subsequent problems due to the drying.

(2) Pertaining to the lower eyelid, massage is first tried to help loosen the scar tissue in hopes that the lid will assume a more normal position. This is attempted for usually a period of 3 months.

(3) If it is clearly known that the problem is due to excessive skin removal then replacing the missing skin is warranted. This done by skin grafts.

(4) Sometimes the skin is not only the problem but the internal aspects are scarred and a cartilage "spacer" graft is needed to support the lid in a more normal position.

(5) Lastly, the tendon of the lower lid at the out corner of the eye may be lax and require tightening.

This the usual way to think through this issue. Have your surgeon refer you to plastic surgeon or an oculoplalstic surgeon to address this issue.

Earl Stephenson, Jr., MD, DDS
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Ectropian repair

+1

Most of the time massaging and taping will help. It has only ben six weeks and the ectropion should improve with time. Make sure the eye is well lubricated to help prevent corneal abrasion.

If revision needs to be performed ectropion repair should be covered under insurance.

Sharon Theresa McLaughlin MD
Long Island City Plastic Surgeon

Post blepharoplasty

+1

The main thing to do now is to keep your eye(s) lubricated, with drops during the day and ointment at night when sleeping.  It is too early to do more surgery since your eyelids can still improve with time over the next 6 months or longer.  Depending on what the exact problem is, there are different surgeries or nonsurgical options than can be done in the future.

Mehryar (Ray) Taban, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Ectropion after lower lid blepharoplasty

+1

Ectropion is caused by excessive skin removal and/or scarring from removal of fat through a skin incision. Ectropion tends to improve over time but it is always better to avoid it in the first place with good technique. You need to see an Ophthalmic Plastic Surgeon if it does not resolve. Personally I think if a surgeon is going to perform a procedure he or she ought to be able to handle the complications.

Peter T. Truong, MD
Fresno Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.