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Surgery Only Solution for One Droopy Eyelid?

It looks like I have a slight but noticeable ptosis due to one eyelid being higher than the other. However, one eyelid actually retracted as a result of Graves disease that onset about 9 years ago. I have been in remission for over five years but the effects are noticeable. The normal eyelid appears to be the droopy one due to the other eyelid retracting.

I was wondering if eyelid surgery is an option and is it the only one? Is there an option to fixing this that doesn't require surgery? What would be the best route?

Doctor Answers (7)

Ptosis or retraction?

+2

Generally thyroid related orbitopathy can result in upper eyelid retraction, this upper eyelid could be pulled down to meet the other one via a levator recession surgery, or you probably got used to the wider eye and like it better than the ptotic eye(your normal eye), and you might want the ptotic side lift. Both can likely be done, and your should have both options discussed with you at your consultation. This particular problem is a tricky, I'd advise you to see an oculoplastic surgeon in your area for this one.


New York Oculoplastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Non-surgical eyelid ptosis treatment

+2

Asymmetric eyelids are not uncommon. Surgery is the usual route to fix the problem long term. However, there are other nonsurgical options available, such as botox to the more droopy side and fillers to the more retracted side, which is too complex to go in detail. Recommend seeing an eyelid specialist familiar with these other treatments.

Mehryar (Ray) Taban, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills Oculoplastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Pseudoptosis in the context of Grave's disease

+2

What you describe is a very detailed diagnosis of pseudoptosis in patients with Grave's disease. The first step is to make sure that you do not have a true ptosis on one side. The second step is to address the Grave's disease on the affected side. In severe cases a levator surgery could be recommended. This consists of placing a spacer into the uppe lid to allow it to drop.

Trying to make the healthy eye look like the graves's disease affected one could be possible pharmacologicaly with certain eye drops but it is not the first recommendation in your case. In any case a detailed clinical exam by a plastic surgeon or ooculoplastic surgeon is warranted. Best of luck!

Hisham Seify, MD, PhD, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

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Occasionally just one eyelid can be fixed

+1

Usually a ptosis operation repair involves repairing both eyelids. Your case sounds a bit unusual because of the Graves disease. An oculoplastic surgeon would be your best bet to have these issues addressed so as not to create dry eye symptoms after the surgery. Occasionally just one eyelid can be fixed, but there is a reflex that occurs between both eyes, and there is a small chance that there will have to be a touch-up procedure on the opposite eye if they are not perfect.

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 60 reviews

Surgery to correct eyelid drooping

+1

There are several options to correct a droopy eyelid. These include stitching the muscles of the eyelid higher, removing some of the muscle from behind the eyelid, and also connecting the muscles in your forehead to the eyelid muscles to help them move. Finally, removing some of the skin of the upper eyelid may also alleviate the droopy appearance. The type of repair done depends on the cause of the droopiness. It sound as though stitching the muscles together in the eyelid may be the best option for you. This is known as levator plication. All surgical options are very well tolerated and usually done on an outpatient basis. Good luck!

Jeffrey E. Schreiber, MD, FACS
Baltimore Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 79 reviews

Pseudoptosis in the context of Grave's disease

+1

What you describe is a very detailed diagnosis of pseudoptosis in patients with Grave's disease. The first step is to make sure that you do not have a true ptosis on one side. The second step is to address the Grave's disease on the affected side. In severe cases a levator surgery could be recommended. This consists of placing a spacer into the uppe lid to allow it to drop.

Trying to make the healthy eye look like the graves's disease affected one could be possible pharmacologicaly with certain eye drops but it is not the first recommendation in your case. In any case a detailed clinical exam by a plastic surgeon or ooculoplastic surgeon is warranted. Best of luck!

Hisham Seify, MD, PhD, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Difficult problem

+1

Your discription is that of a complex problem with asymmetric eyelid position. It takes a bit of analysis to determine what is happening to each eye since you have the possible effects of Graves' and a possible second superimposed problem with ptosis that can be neurogenic, congenital, or traumatic/aging. Asymmetric ptosis gives rise also to compensatory effects such that the retraction of the Graves might be exacerbated due to ptosis of the opposite side. I would advise seeing a specialist in ptosis.

Robin T.W. Yuan, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.