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How to Bring my Eyelid's Elasticity Back?

Ten years ago, I banged my head against the wall very hard, so hard that I needed stitches on my head and that made one of my eyelids lower than the other. Since then I have been really sensitive about my uneven eyelids tht I keep pulling one of my eyelids up. Now, the eyelid has lost elasticity. Is it a bad idea to pull your eyelids upwards? Will I get the elasticity back? If so what are some of the things I need to do to get the elasticity back? Also, how can banging my head on the wall cause me to have an eyelid to get lowered?

Doctor Answers (7)

Elasticity of the skin is directly related to the aging process

+1

The elasticity of the skin is directly related to the aging process. Genetics, sun exposure, and smoking are the primary drivers for aging. The elasticity of the eyelid skin has nothing to do with banging your head against the wall hard several years ago. If there is enough elasticity of the upper eyelids, a blepharoplasty can be performed.


Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 58 reviews

A canthopexy or canthoplasty may be necessary to restore eyelid tone after injury

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It sounds from your history that you have had a nerve injury which is causing the loss of tone in the eyelid--this could be from a direct injury to the branch of the facial nerve that supplies the eyelid, or less likely a central injury caused by the head injury-I would have to examine you to figure it out.

If you have lost tome from a nerve injury, exercise or other non surgoical ,methods will not bring it back.

A procedure called a canthopexy or canthoplasty can be done to tighten and pull the lid up.

I suggest that you see an expert at eyelid surgery so a proper diagnosis can be made. See your family doctor and ask for a referral to a neurologist so that a proper diagnosis can be made first.

Brooke R. Seckel, MD, FACS
Boston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 36 reviews

Eyelid Tone after Injury

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Lower eyelid tone is dependent on the function of the orbicularis muscle, tarsal plate, and the condition of the lateral canthus.  It sounds like you may have disruption of the lateral canthal tendon and may be a candidate for surgical repositioning of the lateral canthus.

Raffy Karamanoukian, MD, FACS
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 49 reviews

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Eyelid asymmetry

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There are so many reasons why you can have eyelid asymmetry after an injury.  it can be related to scar tissue, to nerve injury, to normal asymmetry, to facial fracture, etc..  You should be evaluated by a plastic surgeon, ENT, oculoplastic, or even an oral and maxillofacial surgeon.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
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Possible nerve injuy to the frontalis muscle

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A photograph would be very helpful. It is possible that your injury divided a facial nerve. Specifically the frontal branch. This nerve controls the frontalis muscle. If there has been a weakening or total denervation of the muscle then your eyebrow and consequently your upper eyelid will droop. At this point you require an evaluation by an plastic surgeon. It is possible that reconstructive surgery may help to correct your problem.

Jeffrey Zwiren, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Laser and Skin Care

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In regards to your specific situation I would suggest an evaluation with a plastic surgeon, oculoplastic surgeon or an ENT. You may have enlarged your orbit when you struck your head against a wall or have stretched out a tendon. Its hard to say without an examination and perhaps some additional testing.

Charles Perry, MD
Sacramento Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Recommend a consultation with an oculoplastic surgeon

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Hi Stan,

Reading your concern, I am fairly sure that you have not accurately describe what is going on. I certainly could guess, but I am not sure how helpful that would be for you.

It is unclear if you are describing upper eyelid ptosis with one of the upper eyelids lower than the other. This can be seen following head trauma. These are specialized reconstructive eyelid problems that are best addressed by an eyelid specialist.

As you are in Canada, I recommend that you see a general ophthalmologist or your regular doctor and get a referral to an eyelid specialist. This may be a problem that is covered by your health insurance.

Kenneth D. Steinsapir, MD
Los Angeles Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.