What is the Extra Breast Muscle That Only a Few People Have?

My BA was nearly 3 years ago (375 in left, 425 in right). I have recently noticed a protruding muscle to the left of my right breast. It can be felt and seen. Today, my surgeon has said this is an extra muscle that very few people have. There is also mild contracture in the right breast. He has prescribed glucosamine and chondroitinan and asked me to return in 2 months. To be honest he appeared to lack knowledge about this mystery extra muscle and I'm feeling concerned. What do you think?

Doctor Answers (3)

Extra muscle?

+1

If you are seing a flexion issue left  or medial of your right breast then it is probably the pec muscle. AS for the chondroitan and other cocktails to help with a capsule that is tight, they are not very effective.


Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

What is the Extra Breast Muscle That Only a Few People Have

+1

I am not certain as to what muscle you are referring. AS to CC, the general feeling is that Accolate or Singulair in addition to implant displacement exercises may be beneficial. However, biofilms are implicated and may require implant removal/replacement and pocket change.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

Contracture after breast augmentation

+1

Capsular contracture is a hardening of the scar tissue that forms around the implant (the "capsule") after breast augmentation. It is not known for certain what can lead to the development of this abnormal scarring. It may occur only on one side and not the other, and there is a higher risk with implants placed over the pectoralis muscle, or after infection or hematoma. The pectoralis major muscle is the main chest wall muscle that is raised during surgery to allow placement of the implant underneath. Anatomical variations and even absence of the pectoralis major muscle have been observed.

Olivia Hutchinson, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

You might also like...

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.