Endoscopic Tummy Tuck

Why dont more doctors provide endoscopic tummy tuck? I have scar+tissue around lower part of the abdomen and for for some reason it would feel great if some scraped it out from the skin. Laproscopy could be great. Also if the resulting skin is loose, then it can be tightened using some sort of heat therapy. Are there any laproscopic tummy tuck providers in CA? This scar tissue, feels like hardened mud on cloth.

Doctor Answers (6)

Endocopic Tummy Tuck is not an option

+1

Endoscopic procedures use a combinations of very small incisions and long instruments with a camera.  We have several procedures that can be done endoscopically, but unfortunately, tumm tuck is not one of them. This approach can tighten the muscles but cannot remove loose skin.  ANy laser or Radiofrequency device might tighten the skin a little, but not enough to make a tummy tuck unnecessary.  In this situation, stick with the tried and true procedure 0 standard abdominoplasty.


New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 167 reviews

Tummy tuck with an endoscope

+1

Perhaps for diastasis alone, but otherwise the endoscope has not been useful for tummy tuck, and no laser heating or other treatments will shrink the abdominal skin.

Best of luck,

peterejohnsonmd

Peter E. Johnson, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Endoscopic Tummy Tucks?? NO!-except for the very rare patient that does not have any extra skin....

+1

Endoscopic surgery is a real advance in many areas of plastic surgery.  However, when there is extra skin and fat to be removed, as in a typical tummy tuck, then endoscopy has NO role to play.  There are almost no cases in my over 25 year experience that would have benefitted from this type of operation.  I have seen perhaps one patient who only had muscle weakness following delivery, who did not have any extra skin to get rid of.

So called  "Heat therapy" can only minimally tighten tissues.  I have invested hundreds of thousands of dollars in these technologies over the years, so I know what I am talking about.  The results of non operative heat therapy are very very modest, and they have very very limited use.  A patient with loose excess tummy skin will almost always benefit from a full tummy tuck.  It is a very satisfying operation with extremely high approval ratings.

Claudio DeLorenzi, MD
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

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Endoscopic Tummy Tuck

+1

The answer is if the results were acceptable we would do endo TT's. But poor results cause a bad idea for an operation to be unacceptable. A "STANDARD of CARE" issue. From MIAMI 

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 62 reviews

Endoscopic Tummy Tuck

+1

Endoscopic tummy tucks are not performed because of the need to excise excess skin.  The heat therapy to which you alluded is really not effacious for this amount of excess skin and is used primarily by nonsurgeons.  I agree that an endoscopic tummy tuck could be done if the only problem is diastasis recti; however, this would be a very uncommon situation.

John Whitt, MD
Louisville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

Endo TT

+1

The endoscopic abdominoplasty is indicated for patients who have no loose skin, minimal excess fat of the lower abdomen and bulging of the abdominal wall. The endo TT as a small incision in the pubic region that allows for no skin excision. As most patients seeking TT have some skin laxity to deal with, the endoscopic procedure is the least commonly perfomed.  In our own practice we have performed 5 different types of abdominoplasties based on patients wishes: endoscopic, reverse, midline, mini, and standard. Please see our website to see what would be best for you. 

Marc Schneider, MD
Fort Myers Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.