Can I Help Prevent Scars Now?

I am 2 weeks in after care of breast augmentation. I've been told that one is not supposed to clean or treat scars, (incision area) because it will take longer to heal. Can I use an OTC product during the healing process which may help reduce the appearance of scars? There are postings of people who use Maderma but I tried that many many years ago for stretch ,arks and it did not work so I am reluctant to purchase based on infomercials rather than experience.

Doctor Answers (17)

Wait 4-6 weeks before applying scar treatment products to breast implant incisions

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Thank you for your question. You should always follow the advice of the plastic surgeon who performed your breast augmentation.

Generally speaking I prefer to allow breast augmentation incisions to heal 4-6 weeks before instituting topical breast scar treatments such as scar guard, silicone sheeting or other therapies.

For very inflamed, red, raised, lumpy, itchy incisions, 1540 fractional erbium laser treatments can be very effective


Boston Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 29 reviews

Proactive scar management

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Every person heals differently and will improve over the next 3 to 6 months.  Some patients require up to one year to fully mature.  A nice scar starts in the operation room. The incision must be placed in the right position, sutured keeping the tension off of the skin itself.  Also it has been show that keeping the incision taped for the first three weeks keeps some of the early tension off of the scar.  Then from the end of the third week to the end of the third month it helps to use a topical product with silicone.   

Jeffrey Zwiren, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Scars

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The passage of time and your natural healing tendencies are the most important factors determining your scar outcome.

Norman Bakshandeh, MD, FACS
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

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Scar Treatment 2 Weeks after Breast Augmentation

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      Everyone has his or her opinion on this issue, but I wait until the scar is about 4 to 6 weeks to even suggest any intervention.  Usually, I do not recommend people purchase anything in particular, but your plastic surgeon would be your best resource.

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
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Post Op Scar Treatment

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is not something I recommend as a routine.  As long as your scar is remaining a fine line, I do not recommend anything.  If you notice that your scar is thickening and becoming raised, interventions may be considered then.  I have not been impressed with any of the over the counter scar products and if one of them really worked, we would all be using it.

Curtis Wong, MD
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Scars after Breast Augmentation

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-Although you can't "prevent" scars once an incision has been made through your skin, you may be able to help improve the appearance of your scars after your breast augmentation.

-Beginning 3 weeks after breast augmentation, I recommend my patients use a moisturizing cream of their choice and gently massage their scars a couple times a day.  This may promote softening of the scar and perhaps also my lighten the scar's appearance more quickly.

- Do remember that with time, months to a year, your scars will fade significantly, and become less red.

Best of luck to you!

 

Joshua Cooper, MD, FACS
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

The best way to get good results from a scar is to leave it alone.

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Scar creams, massage, lasers, etc.  don't work and might even cause harm.  Leave the scar alone, keeping it out of the sun and making sure clothing (bras) don't rub on it.

Vincent N. Zubowicz, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Scar Management Can Be Delayed Without Adverse Effects

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Thank you for your question.  Immediately after surgery most surgeons recommend allowing the incisions to heal and completely "re-epithelialize"...heal from the top layer of skin before utilizing scar management strategies.  It is usually recommended that you wait several weeks before initiating therapy so that occlusive gels or dressings do not contribute to any healing problems or the ability to evaluate the wound.  Rest assured that a couple of weeks delay will not have any significant effect on the final scar quality.  I would recommend you wait until your surgeon recommends starting.  Silicone gel and sheeting has the best available data on scar improvement.  You should continue this therapy daily for 4-6 months for best results.   MakeMeHeal.Com or AARTINC.NET has a good selection of scar management products.  Best Wishes!

Robert F. Centeno, MD, FACS
Fairfax Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Using a scar treatment after breast augmentation surgery

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Valid scar treatments can help you obtain the best possibly outcome given a particular wound. However, they will not make a scar disappear nor will they result in a narrow scar where there already is a wide one.

I usually have my patients start using scar treatment a few weeks after surgery. You should ask your plastic surgeon again about this and when he/she is ok with you starting its usage.

Good luck!

Steven Turkeltaub, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

Scar Treatment after Augmentation

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Early in the healing process, first 8 weeks or so, the highest contributor to poor scars is stretch.  Stretch leads to widening of the scar.  For this reason, I have my patients tape the scars for 8 weeks.  After this, too much collagen formation is responsible for poor scarring, for this reason I like to have my patients start scar therapy with a topical steroid which reduces scar formation, such as scar guard.

Best Wishes!

Pablo Prichard, MD

Pablo Prichard, MD
Phoenix Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.