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Most Effective Treatment Ultherapy or Surgery for Droopy Eyes?

I am a 57 year old male with droopy eye lids. I can provide a photo. He extent of the droop increases as the day goes on making me feel very tired. This has progressed over the last 5 or 10 years. After reading some previous posts I believe my brows have fallen below their optimum position and this may be a significant factor in my droop? Is Ultherapy effective for brow lift and is that what I should pursue or is sugary my best choice? I can supply a close up photo if that would help.

Doctor Answers (6)

Fallen Eyebrows Often Respond Well To Volumizing Fillers

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Fallen eyebrows, which result from the shrinkage and downward displacement of the remnants of the brow fat pads in both men and women, often respond nicely to the appropriate placement of injectable volumizing fillers, such as Juvederm UltraPlus XC. An additional lift, when deemed necessary, may also be obtained with the injection of tiny droplets of Botox, Dysport or Xeomin to soften the downward pull of the muscles of facial expression in the region. In general, I have been disappointed with the results of energy-based therapies, such Fraxel, ultrasound, and radiofrequency. 

The placement of the volumizers should be done by someone experienced in treating the brow, since the male and female brows differ in contour, and the creation of a feminine brow in a male can be quite displeasing. On the other hand, when properly performed, the results of a liquid browlift are immediate and usually quite gratifying.

When there is secondarily significant hooding of the true upper lids by fallen brows, a Ten Minute Eyelift may be more in order. A detailed description of that procedure, which is minimally invasive and has a short healing period, may be found in the medical library of my website.


New York Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Ultherapy can help lift the forehead and upper eyelids / eyebrows.

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If you know you don't want any surgery, then the forehead and upper eyebrow / eyelid complex can be treated with ultherapy for tightening.  Fillers, such as restylane can be injected in the upper eyelid areas to correct for lowering.

Ronald Shelton, MD
Manhattan Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Most Effective Treatment Ultherapy or Surgery for Droopy Eyes?

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With what you described, it sounds like surgery is needed.  Your best option is to get an official consult.  Good luck.

Sam Goldberger, MD
Beverly Hills Oculoplastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

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Ulthera or eyelid/brow surgery

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It sounds like you need more of an elevationof the brow or eyelid surgery. Without an exam I really can not say, but Ulthera will not do the trick.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Ulthera is not powerful or precise enough to help you.

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Ulthera will provide modest improvement in skin laxity but it will not replace a forehead lift or eyelid surgery.  Ultimately there is no substitute for a personal consultation with an experienced surgeon who can personally assess you and then discuss the pros and cons of a variety of approaches.

Kenneth D. Steinsapir, MD
Los Angeles Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Ulthera vs. surgery for the eyes

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Hi Red Rock Hound,

 

Surgery. . .surgery, surgery.  Ulthera is actually not a bad treatment.  I performed about 55 of them in 2011 but for the brow heaviness or eyelid skin laxity it's just not that great.  It's not bad for the neck and jawline as long as you understand it's not surgery.  You would spend a bit more on surgery with a weeks worth for down time but be much happier.  That is really just an opinion based on my experience.  I would get a few consults.

Dr. Lay

Chase Lay, MD
Bay Area Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 39 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.