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Very Visible Scars 9 Weeks Post-Op Earlobe Surgery, What Can I Do?

Scars are in the front of my earlobes and very visible. I do use scar cream several times a day and massage. I use concealer. My surgery was performed over seas a Should I be worried about these scars or let time heal ? I also had resurfacing done with the face lift and use sunblock as directed on daily basis. my neck and face have dark spots, was recommended to use skin lightening cream at night daily and I do not think it is working. Any recommendations please? Thanks Yogi

Doctor Answers (5)

Scarring in front of ear from facelift

+1

The scars will get better. I was not understanding whether this was just for something for your ears. But gathered that it was related to a face lift that you had.  Pictures would be really helpful to assess your situation. Scars from a facelift can be lasered but sometimes you need to have them excised or cut out.  This may not be a simple repair after a facelift. You may need some more pulling to recruit some more skin to allow the area to close after excising the scar away. Below is a video to illustrate our answer better. We have other informative videos and information on our website and a link is included to help you find us.
 


Bellevue Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 37 reviews

Scars 9 weeks After Surgery?

+1

Thank you for the question.

You will find that the case of the scar will improve with time. All the scar will never disappear it should improve in regards to discoloration (often red/purple at this stage in recovery). In the meantime, the use of silicone-based products may be helpful.

I hope this helps.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 720 reviews

Scarring after earlobe repair

+1
At nine weeks postop. Yu are just past the inflammatory phase of healing. You can expect the scarring to gradually fade over the next year. Once the ears have healed enough for repiercing, the scars will be less visible while wearing earrings. If the scars become hypertrophic, this can be treated by injection or silicone sheeting.

Robert L. Kraft, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

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Continue with the scar creams for the ears

+1

The ear scars will take some time.  Laser treatments to reduce the redness may help.  Scar strips of silicone may also help reduce the scars in addition to the scar creams you are using.  Sunblock to protect you scars and skin is important, as is a hat duirng the heat of the day.

Resurfacing splotches and brown spots probably will also need some Retin-A creams, possibly some laser treatments, or intensed pulsed light treatments (IPL) to improve the areas.  You should see a dermatologist or a plastic surgeon for some help with this.

Keith Denkler, MD
Marin Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

Earlobe Postop Scarring

+1

Facial scars, including those of the earlobes, are noticeable for a few reasons: 1) color 2) width and 3) texture/depth.  Technically, scars never fully go away, but they can be minimized in appearance so that they are less or  un-noticeable.  When a wound is put together with sutures, it has to be done very meticulously to minimize any potential scarring afterwards.  If the color is different, that attracts attention.  If the scar is widened, raised (like a keloid) or depressed, that again attracts attention.  The least noticeable scars are the ones that are pencil thin and light or skin color.  There are also special creams that are used to improve any facial scars that are only available through a specialist.  If the scar is not healing properly, you may have to get it revised.  Please consult with a board certified specialist who can assist you.

Kimberly Lee, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.