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Can I Drain Milk After Breast Implant Surgery?

After a few weeks of my implant surgery, one of the ends where my doctor cut is not closing and it's draining white water with a smell of milk. I went to go see my doctor right away and asked me all simptoms of infection and I said no to all of them. That's when my Doctor said it was milk, is this true ?

Doctor Answers (8)

Milk let down after Breast Augmentation

+2

This indeed can and does happen even to women whom have not been pregnant recently.  It is due to the feedback mechanism from the breast tissue nerves being stimulated by the pressure of the breast implant, all this tricks the brain into thinking the breasts are "pregnant" and ready for breast feeding.  As always it it best to take the advice of your operating surgeon who is seeing you first hand.  Best of luck...RAS

Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Breast Augmentation

+1

If you have white milk like substance draining form a breast after surgery and your surgeon thinks it is milk, milk it is.  There aren’t any other options.  A milk duct was probably in the incision line and was cut with milk in the duct draining out.  Discuss with your Board Certified Plastic Surgeon and determine the course of action to take.

Danville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Milk after breast implants

+1

It could very well be milk.  I tell my patients that if they are lactating, that they should wait about 3-6 months after stopping before undergong breast surgery. 

Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Drainage through breast implant incision

+1

If your incision is leaking fluid is might be milk if you were lactating shortly before your breast augmentation. The risk now is that bacterial contamination can result in an infection around the breast implant as the incision is open. Milk or not the risk is real with considerable consequence. Keep the area clean and covered an stay in close touch with your surgeon.

Best of luck,

peterejohnsonmd

Web reference: http://www.peterejohnsonmd.com

Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 25 reviews

Lactation a few weeks after surgery

+1

The answer to your question is simply yes, it can be milk, particularly if the sugery was done shortly after you gave birth,  or stopped nursing.  That is why we try to wait 4-6 months after birth or after nursing before we proceed with surgery, so the body has a chance to dry up all of the milk production. If it has been  longer than that, you should bring it to the attention of your doctor as you may need an endocrinology work up. 

Short Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Lactation after breast augmentation

+1

The sensory nerve supply to the nipple-areolar complex also governs the milk let down reflex, so it's possible that breast augmentation with a periareolar approach can trigger lactation.  Ask your PS what techniques may be applied to reduce milk production and cool cabbage leaves may be mentioned.  Palodel is a medication which rarely is used if nonmedical measures (chest wrapping,etc.) are unsuccessful. 

Milk is a suspension of protein, fat and water and provides a requisite environment for wound healing dificulties, suture disruption, cellulities and even capsular contracture.  Do press your PS for a definitive plan of care.  good luck.

Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 30 reviews

Draining milk after breast implant surgery?

+1

How long after you quit nursing did you have your surgery, that is, assuming you had quit nursing?

We usually wait 4-6 months after cessation of nursing before doing breast augmentation to try to avoid this problem.

 

Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 66 reviews

Best to wait until breast milk is dried up before breast surgery

+1

It is possible that you could be draining milk - especially if you were still producing breast milk at the time of your surgery.

Las Vegas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 33 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.

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