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Will Downsizing from 300cc to 240cc Be a Noticeable Difference or Should I Get 210cc?

I got 300cc implants behind the muscle 6 months ago. I wanted a B and I am now a C. Would going down 60cc make a noticeable difference (240cc), or should I go down the 90cc (210cc)? I am 5'0" 112 pounds.

Doctor Answers (4)

Downsizing breast implants by 60 cc

+1

In my opinion 60 cc is not sufficient to warrant an additional surgery unless this was for breast asymmetry alone.


Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

Downsizing implants

+1

Dropping 60 cc's or 100 cc's is hard to say for you how that would change your cup size.  Approximately 150-200 cc's is a cup sometimes more depending upon your initial volume.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Downsizing Implants

+1

As per the previous posting, I would agree that it would be difficult to tell without actually seeing you.  For most patients, a 100 cc difference in volume will often relate to a change in one cup size.  What you need to ask yourself is whether or not you would like to be a little too big still or go a little small.  My guess is that if you want to err on the conservative side, you might want to go with the 90 cc volume reduction. 

 

I hope that helps!

Gregory A. Buford, MD, FACS
Denver Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

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Downsizing implants.

+1

Your question is a difficult one to answer without actually seeing you. However, a rough rule of thumb for breast volume is that 200cc makes one cup size. Therefore, if you go from a 300 to a 240cc implant you are reducing the size by about a quarter of a cup. Depending on whether you are a small, medium or full C you will need to judge this for yourself. I would recommend, however, that you discuss this with your plastic surgeon and follow his/her advice.

Paul Vitenas, Jr., MD
Houston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.