Does LED Work for Acne Treatment?

Acne - can't stand that nothing is working to reduce it.  I read about LED light treatments and that could work on acne, but  not  going that direction unless someone can tell me it works.  too expensive and time consuming if not. 

Doctor Answers (5)

Blue light LED works to improve acne

+3

I have found LED blue light therapy very effective for treating acne but it does require multiple treatments.

LED light treatments in our practice are $35 per session and only $25 per session if done with another service such as a deep cleansing facial.

Typically patients will come in for two treatments a week for 3-4 weeks or until improvement is visible. At that point we gradually decrease the frequency of treatments. The treatment only takes about 20 minutes and does not leave any visible signs that you have had a treatment done.


Orlando Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 102 reviews

Treating acne with LED light

+3

I am only familiar with the Gentle Waves LED. I think it is excellent for post procedure treatments. It seems to really calm the skin. Gentle Waves generally gives the skin a nice tone and texture. Patients look more relaxed and healthier.

However, it does not satisfactorily addressall the causes of acne: sticky, plugged pores, bacterial overgrowth in the pores, excessive sebum output and the subsequent inflammation. It only works on the latter. So while it might be somewhat helpful in acne, there are far far more effective treatments available.

Arnold R. Oppenheim, MD
Virginia Beach Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

LED Blue Light Treatment For Acne

+2

LED blue light therapy is often quite effective for mild to moderate acne. Acne is often exacerbated by the presence of bacteria, particularly  P.acnes which multiply in the sebaceous glands. The skin becomes inflamed when the body tries to fight these invaders. Inflammation is something that is worth addressing/preventing since it can lead to acne scars.

People with acne typically have more bacteria in their follicles than those without acne. Keep in mind that this is just a correlation. Bacteria is not the cause of acne breakouts.

LED works when the light is absorbed by the polyphorins which are produced by the bacterial cell bodies. This leads to the destruction of these organisms.

The Spectra laser, however, not only addresses bacteria, it also inhibits the activity level of oil producing sebaceous glands. And it also clears out blockages in your skin pores. 

Sanusi Umar, MD
Redondo Beach Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

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LED for acne

+1
L.E.D.( Light Emitting Diode) can help to prevent and control papules, pustules, and typical acne quite effectively if done properly. The L.E.D. penetrates into the dermis and slows sebaceous glands that create oils in the skin that can cause acne. Non inflamed acne such as whiteheads and blackheads tend to respond less effectively. Multiple treatments are required. Treatments are typically done twice a week for a few weeks. We offer L.E.D. treatments in office for $50 per treatment. A home regime would also be prescribed as needed. It is always best to have a consultation before treating any skin concerns.

Steven H. Williams, MD
San Francisco Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Blue LED light can be helpful for acne, particuarly preceded by Levulan

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Blue LED light can be helpful for acne by reducing colonies of bacteria responsible for acne and by exerting anti-inflammatory effects on the skin. However, the clinical benefits of Blue LED light multiplies when it is preceded by application of Levulan of various duration as determined by an experienced board-certified dermatologist when it used as part of photodynamic therapy (PDT).

William Ting, MD
Bay Area Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.