Difference Between Breast Tissue and Fat Cells?

Lets consider a case of male with gynocamestia. I know you are only born with certain number of fat cells and if you liposuction them all, they are gone for ever. Only the remaining fat cells can increase or decrease up to a certain degree. What about breast tissue. Are you born with certain number of breast tissue cells as well. If you surgically remove the ENTIRE gland can you still grow breast tissue again provided you are messing with hormones?

Doctor Answers (9)

Changes with Time

+1

Removal of breast tissue is permanent after you have reached sexual maturity.  Breast size changes with time due to fat.   Gynecomastia is a very common surgical procedure and may even be covered by your insurance.


Saint Louis Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Can breast gland tissue grow back after gynecomastia surgery

+1

Gynecomastia surgery typically involves removing fat and breast gland tissue that has developed in the chest.  Once the gland tissue is removed, it should not come back.  This assumes that you are not doing something to promote this like using anabolic steroids in which case all bets are off.  The original reason for the gynecomastia is likely related to the hormonal changes of puberty.  So, assuming you're not going to go through puberty again, you should be fine!

Dr. Parham Ganchi - NJ Plastic Surgeon

Parham Ganchi, PhD, MD
Wayne Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 56 reviews

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Breast Tissue Regrowth after Surgery for Gynecomastia?

+1

Assuming that hormonal levels remain stable, I believe that once the breast tissue is removed it is very unlikely that the remaining breast tissue will increase in size.

 I hope this answers your question. Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
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Result of gynecomastia surgery is permanent.

+1

Hi.

1)  In most cases, some fat and most of the glandular tissue is removed.

2)  If you are "messing with hormones", the outcome is unpredictable and I would not recommend surgery.

George J. Beraka, MD (retired)
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Male gynecomastia

+1

thank you for your question about male breast reduction.

  • The male breast, like the female breast, has a certain number of breast tissue cells.
  • Male breast reduction removes many of the breast tissue cells - but not all of them.
  • Hormones can enlarge the breast tissue that remains.
  • The only way to remove the entire gland is a mastectomy - usually done for cancer.
  • Male breast reduction surgery removes the glandular tissue either by liposuction, by surgical removal or both - but some glandular tissue remains.

Elizabeth Morgan, MD, PhD
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Gynecomastia

+1

With my experience, once you remove all the breast tissue, it doesn't grow back.  Consult with a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon to address your concerns and expectations.

Robert E. Zaworski, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
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Gynecomastia and tissue removal

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Ideally with gynecomastia you are looking for a specific contour result and that really depends upon your body habitus.  You never remove all the fat cells because you  need to leavge a layer between the skin and soft tissue below.

Steven Wallach, MD
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Recurrence of Male Gynecomastia after Surgical Reduction

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Your questions show many common misconceptions about fat cells and breast tissue. You can never completely remove all fat cells from any area nor can all breast tissue in a male gynecomastia be removed. Under proper stimulation both fat cells and male breast tissue can regrow. However, in most cases of male gynecomastia reduction, recurrent breast tissue growth is not a problem that I have seen. (the development of scar tissue may occur but not new breast tissue)

Barry L. Eppley, MD, DMD
Indianapolis Plastic Surgeon
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These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.