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Did I Lose my Turbinate During Surgery or is the Septoplasty Stint Pushing It Up into my Nose So That I Can't See It.

I am post-op day 3 and I can see the lower turb in the left nares, but it looks a bit floppy and i do not see on at all on the right side. Is it possible that it's still there or more likely that it's gone altogether. i am hoping the stints are pushing it up into the nasal cavity becuase I a was really clear with my physician that I wanted the turbinate reduction to be done very conservatively, and just a slight reduction. I am worried and kinda feel violated about it. I am a singer.

Doctor Answers (3)

Septoplasty and turbinoplasty

+1

It's nearly impossible to do a complete nasal self-exam without the appropriate instruments.  It's also not a great idea to manipulate your nose so much immediately after surgery.  Discuss your concerns with your surgeon as she/he will be able to tell you exactly what was and wasn't done.  


Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Did I Lose my Turbinate During Surgery or is the Septoplasty Stint Pushing It Up into my Nose So That I Can't See It.

+1

 IMHO, it's best that you don't manipulate your nose much after the procedures you are describing.  You're most likely scheduled to have the silastic stent removed shortly and at that time could discuss what was done to your inferior turbinate(s) with your Rhinoplasty Surgeon.  

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Leave your freshly operated nose alone

+1

Don't look in it, don't push it up , dont stick things in it. Let it heal and let the swelling go down. You arent equipped to judge what has been done or especially to question your doctors operation at this stage or really any stage until the final result materializes. I'm glad youre not my patient.

Richard Ellenbogen, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

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