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Does a deviated septum surgery require turbinate removal?

I have a devited septum on the right side, turbinates are swollen on the left side. if i fix the septum,, won't the turbinate swelling and compensatory hypertrophy issues resolve themselves?

Doctor Answers (2)

Does a deviated septum surgery require turbinate removal?

+1
The septoplasty can be performed without doing anything to the turbinate if the turbinate is not enlarged. If the turbinate contributes to the nasal airway blockage, then a better correction will be obtained by doing something to the turbinate as well. There are several ways to diminish the turbinate obstruction without necessarily removing it.

Keep in mind, that following the advice from a surgeon on this or any other website who proposes to tell you what to do without examining you, physically feeling the tissue, assessing your desired outcome, taking a full medical history, and discussing the pros and cons of the proposed operative procedure with you may not be in your best interest. I would suggest you find a plastic surgeon certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery and ideally a member of the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery (ASAPS) or facial plastic surgeon (otolaryngologist) that you trust and are comfortable with. You should discuss your concerns with that surgeon in person.

Robert Singer, MD FACS

La Jolla, California


La Jolla Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Deviated septum repair and turbinate removal.

+1
The deviated septum can be repaired and the issue of the turbinates dealt with individually. It Depends on whether the  turbinates are the type that are too large in which case they can be made  smaller but not removed.

Toby Mayer, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.