How Likely is It to Develop Empty Nose Syndrome After Rhinoplasty W/septoplasty and Turbinectomy? What Can I Do to Avoid ENS?

Doctor Answers (4)

Empty nose syndrome after rhinoplasty? No.

+2

The volume of the nasal turbinates can be safely reduced to improve breathing, but the key is to not remove the overlying mucous membranes. Turbinate reduction, as it's called,  is achieved through several different means and should not lead to ENS. In fact, I've never seen that occur with merely turbinate reduction.

Turbinectomy (removing a turbinate), on the other hand, is what can lead to Empty Nose Syndrome and should be avoided.

Rhinoplasty and septoplasty by themselves do not lead to ENS, either.

Bottom line: discuss with your surgeon whether the plan is to remove the turbinates or simply reduce them.

All the best,

--DCP

Pearson Facial Plastic Surgery®


Jacksonville Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Empty nose syndrome after rhinoplasty or septoplasty

+2

  Empty nose syndrome should not occur after a rhinoplasty or septoplasty. It usually occurs  when too much inferior or middle turbinates have been resected.

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 58 reviews

How Likely is It to Develop Empty Nose Syndrome After Rhinoplasty W/septoplasty and Turbinectomy? What Can I Do to Avoid ENS?

+1

    This would be extremely unlikely and reflects more on historical procedures.

 

 

Kenneth Hughes, MD

Los Angeles, CA

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 218 reviews

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Empty Nose Syndrome is associated with removal of too much turbinate tissue.

+1

You may benefit from having this discussion with your surgeon. ENS is not associated with rhinoplasty or septoplasty. We have not seen ENS in any of our patients treated with turbinate reduction (submucous electrodessication), or partial turbinate resection.

Your decision to have turbinectomy needs to be made between you and your surgeon, and you should share your concerns before surgery. My hunch is that you may be reassured, since ENS is an extremely uncommon condition.

Hope this helps, and I wish you well.

Dr. Joseph

Eric M. Joseph, MD
West Orange Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 278 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.