Dented Right Side of Bridge From Sunglasses. Will It Bounce Back? (photo)

It has been 10 weeks since my rhinoplasty. I wore a pair of sunglasses the other day thinking it was okay. I wore them for 30 minutes Now 2 days after the right side of my bridge looks slightly indented. I am freaking out. I called my plastic surgeon and he told me not to panic and that it would probably resolve on it's own. The problem is I don't see any change at all and I am very worried that I may have damaged my bridge. Could this have happened and if it did what are my alternatives to fixing this?

Doctor Answers (2)

Dent in nose from sunglasses after having Rhinoplasty...

+1

After a Rhinoplasty, patients typically wait 1 month before wearing sunglasses.  Since it's been 10 weeks after surgery, the bones have fully healed and the eyeglasses will cause no damage.  The nose may still have a small degree of swelling or edema, and the glasses can temporarily dent the edema.  This should however resolve within a few hours.  If you are still concerned, follow up with your plastic surgeon to discuss your questions and to make sure everything is healing properly.


Edison Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

Dented Right Side of Bridge From Sunglasses. Will It Bounce Back?

+1

Nothing to worry about. At 10 weeks after surgery everything is pretty much stuck down and the weight of the glasses (even if you wore a pair of Elton John's old glasses). What is not resolved is the swelling and it will take months for it to normalize. You may want to massage the area and wear tape on the bridge of the glasses to hold them to the forehead and keep them from putting pressure on the nose.

PS no need to fritz out. You have a very nice result.

Peter A. Aldea, MD
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 58 reviews

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