How Are Saline Breast Implants Deflated?

You mentioned that you could have the Saline breast implants deflated in situ and then determine how to proceed--removal alone or removal with breast lift. When this is done, is the saline released into the body or is a tube inserted to let the saline flow out of the body?

Doctor Answers (9)

Deflating saline implants

+3

Hello,

If the implant is to be used again (which BTW can void the implant's warranty), then a filler tube and syringe can be used to inflate and deflate the implant. If it is to be removed, the implant can simply be popped and the saline sucked out using a suction tube. I usually try to use a tube to make it cleaner. Older implants can make this more difficult.

The answer is it depends.


Orange Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Saline Implant Deflation

+2

It is a very simple painless procedure done in the office. The lateral area of your breast is injected with a numbing solution and after a minute a syringe with a needle is inserted and the saline is aspirated from the implant.

This gives you and the surgeon a good way of assessing how much breast tissue you have and what things would look like once the implant is removed.

Farbod Esmailian, MD
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Saline Can be Drawn out In the Office

+2

The skin can be numbed and a nnedle and syringe is used to remove the fluid. In very thin individuals, the remaining implant may cause some minor shape irregularity but usually this is not a problem.

My experience is that the breast looks a little more saggy right after this procedure than it will after the actual implant removal. Your skin will contract to some degree over a few days, which may make a lift unnecessary.

John LoMonaco, MD, FACS
Houston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 160 reviews

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Simple office procedure

+1

Hi,

Thank you for your question.

The implant can be deflated in office using a needle and syringe under local anesthesia. You breasts will likely contract in the next few days so yes, sometimes a lift is required.

Best regards,

Dr. Speron

Sam Speron, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon

Delating saline implants

+1

Sometimes before implant exchange, the saline implants are deflated a week or so before surgery. This is usually done if you are downsizing your implants because it allows for some time for your skin to contract to a smaller size prior to putting in the smaller implants. The deflation is performed in the office using a needle and a syringe to pull out the saline. I hope this is helpful. Good luck with your surgery.

David Shafer, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 54 reviews

Either way

+1

You can have a small surgical procedure to deflate the implants via the tubing or simply puncture the implant with a needle and have the saline slowly leak out and slowly resorbed over time.

Robin T.W. Yuan, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Saline implants can be deflated easily in the doctors office

+1

If it is desired to deflate saline implants as a guide to pre-operative planning, it is straightforward to do.

The skin can be numbed with local and a needle and syringe are used to remove the saline. It is not necessary to remove every last bit of saline. Whatever doesn't come out initially will leak out and be absorbed over time.

John E. Gross, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

Deflating slaine implants

+1

Deflating a saline implant is fairly straightforward. This can be done easily in a treatment room under local anesthesia. Although I do not usually do  this, it can help with preoperative assessment of asymmetry.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Deflation of saline implants

+1

All it takes to deflate an implant is a needle stick which is not unlike drawing your blood. The saline can aspirated (sucked out) or it can leak into the body where it will be rapidly absorbed.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 41 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.