Was Deflating Implants Right Choice?? Why Wasn't I Warned That I Could Get Seroma?

I got saline implants 8 yrs ago & always thought they're too big. 2 weeks ago I decided I want to have them removed & maybe a lift. The PS suggested delfating implants at her office so I could see what they would look like & leaving shells in for weeks to months for best results. A week after the deflation, my breats got huge and I got really ill. I got seroma.Now this PS said I need a capsulectomy. But, my first PS is saying I need to close the capsule and drains.Thoughts??

Doctor Answers (6)

Seroma following deflation of saline implants

+1

I have never seen this problem following deflation of saline implants in the office. Your surgeon did not warn you because this is not a common risk of deflation. You need to have the seroma dained and the fluid should be examined for abdnormal cells and/or infection. With seromas, it is usually recommended to remove the capsule.

You have a most unusual situation and you should work with your surgeon to get resolution.


Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 45 reviews

Breast deflation

+1

Some surgeons report deflating implants before doing a lift if the patient does not want the implants in anymore.  It is strange for the breasts to swell up. COuld it be an infectoin or seroma? Perhaps. Hard to tell you what to do without an examoh

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Was an In Office Deflation of Breast Implants the Right Choice??

+1

It sounds like you are getting conflicting information from two of your Plastic surgeons. If you did not have any issues with your breast implants for 8 years it is highly unlikely that placing a needle in sterile fashion into the implants (to deflate them to show you the current size of your breasts) could have caused a seroma. Seromas are usually seen shortly after surgery especially when lymphatics are disrupted. This is more suggestive of either an infection or bleeding (potentially caused by puncturing a blood vessels).

Only a trained Plastic surgeons who examines you can suggest the best course for you. To start off, you should have fluid sent off for microbiological cultures. An imaging study as simple as an ultrasound or a CT could clear up your diagnosis. IF you have an infection of both breasts, the deflated implants would have to be removed to allow your body to fight the infection. Depending on the thickness of the capsule and the circumstances (infection VS no infection) capsule removal without immediate breast implant placement may be needed until things settle down

Peter A. Aldea, MD
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 62 reviews

You might also like...

Breast implants

+1

Seroma is not a common risk after deflation of implants. From your description you need to make sure you have no INFECTION, OR HEMATOMA.

Either way you need surgery removal of the capsule and drain the breast. Treat the infection based on the cultures. See you plastic surgeon ASAP

Samir Shureih, MD
Baltimore Plastic Surgeon

Removal of Implants and Complications

+1

Thank you for the question.

It  sounds like you have had an unusual experience along with unusual complications. What concerns me most in your description is when you state that you  “got really ill”. if you have signs or symptoms of an infection then I'm concerned that you had more than a seroma  as a complication.

I would continue to follow-up with your plastic surgeon and seek other opinions as necessary.

Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 759 reviews

Weird breast story

+1

This is a very strange situation and I have never heard of a seroma after deflating a breast implant.  Maybe a hematoma if the needle poked a blood vessel.  Perhaps even an infection.  Either way, there can be no useful answers on the internet for this unusual situation.  Please see doctors in person for this.

Richard P. Rand, MD, FACS
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 50 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.