Can Deflated Saline Implants Be Left Alone While I Finish Breastfeeding (Up to a Year)?

I have ten year old saline implants (went from a B to a full C- about 350cc, round, smooth, below the muscle) and after three pregnancies and lots of nursing- I just want them out! But I don't want to risk damaging any tissue at this point- would I be able to have the simple deflating procedure and then go back in to remove what's left after my son completes nursing- which could be up to a year from now. Thanks.

Doctor Answers (6)

Deflating Saline Implants and Breast Feeding

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Though the simple answer is yes, deflating procedure and then go back in to remove what's left after my son completes nursing I am not sure why that would be a benefit. I would recommend removing them after you are finished with nursing and allowed for adequate time for your breasts to return to normal.


Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 45 reviews

Deflating implants

+1

I would not purposely deflate implants.  I am not sure why you would need them removed while you are breast feeding?

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

A deflated implant can remain safely for any length of time.

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A deflated implant poses no greater health problem then an inflated implant and can remain indefinitely in ones breast until the decision to remove it is made. In fact, it never really has to be removed.

David A. Ross, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 69 reviews

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Purposefully Deflating Breast Implants

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Regarding: "Can Deflated Saline Implants Be Left Alone While I Finish Breastfeeding (Up to a Year)?
I have ten year old saline implants (went from a B to a full C- about 350cc, round, smooth, below the muscle) and after three pregnancies and lots of nursing- I just want them out! But I don't want to risk damaging any tissue at this point- would I be able to have the simple deflating procedure and then go back in to remove what's left after my son completes nursing- which could be up to a year from now. Thanks
."

Deflating saline breast implants is easy and straight forward. After cleaning the skin with either alcohol or surgical soap, a sterile needle attached either to a large syringe or a suction device is placed through the skin into the implant and the saline is aspirated, flattening the implant. Uncommonly, this MAY be complicated by an infection or bruising. Since you are STILL nursing, the potential for infection would be higher than what it may be otherwise.

Be sure you understand what you are asking for. Deflated saline implants CAN stay in the body indefinitely and pose no threat to you. But, if you do change your mind and decide you want the implants exchanged instead of removed, the surgeon would have to recreate the implant pocket which would be slowly obliterated by the body after implant deflation.

Dr. Peter Aldea

Peter A. Aldea, MD
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 62 reviews

Implant deflation: how long can it be left?

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There is a small but possible risk of infection with the deflation procedure but if this is causing you significant discomfort than I would consider it an option. I assuming you are planning on replacing the implants because this would cause significant discomfort wtih expansion of the tissue.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

Certainly could, but why

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I am not quite sure why you would want to do this as you do risk infection from the deflation procedure.  Unless they are causing you a problem I would leave them alone until you are finished breast feeding and then have them removed.  The other problem is that after deflation they do shrink down by the capsule contracture and may be a little harder to find., The decision of course is your and if you decide to do this please make sure you use a board certified plastic surgeon just in case there are problems.

Steven Schuster, MD
Boca Raton Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.