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What can I do about the deep scar between my eyes?

I have an indented scar from trauma that runs horizontally between my eyes. It makes me self conscious since I am young. A doctor once told me that since it's my nose, the cartilage won't grow back and that my best option is Juvederm which would cost me $400, but would only last 6 to 9 months. Are there any other options out there with better longevity, prices, and results for my situation, or is there anything else I can do to lessen the appearance of my scar? Thank you.

Doctor Answers (8)

Camoflaging a scar

+2
The human eye is drawn to straight lines, therefore a straight-line scar in between the eyes becomes noticeable.  With that being said, there are a few options to help minimize the appearance of a scar.  The first option is called subsicion with fat-grafting.  This means the scar is lifted from the underlying tissue and fat is placed underneath.  This may make the scar appear more flush with the surrounding normal skin rather than its current indentation.  This is considered minimally invasive and is performed percutaneously with needles.


A more invasive option would be to simply excise or remove the current scar, which is otherwise known as scar revision.  Many times, traumatic wounds are closed quickly as there are other associated injuries that may be more important.  Revising a scar with meticulous closure often improves the appearance.


Beverly Hills General Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Scar treatment

+2
There is no way to erase a scar, but its appearance can be improved. A small scar, regardless of its location on your nose, may be surgically removed and then re-sutured. It can be re-sutured in a straight line or in a zig zag line so that the human eye cannot follow it. This is the most cost effective and long term scar treatment. Using fillers with subcision to plump up the indented portion can also help. Radiesse lasts longer than Juvederm, and it comes in a 0.3 ml size.

Ramona Behshad, MD
Chesterfield Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Scar removal options

+2
Miss Lynne

Sorry to hear about your scar. There are many options to consider when treating the face, and I agree with others that a photo would be helpful in making recommendations. How old is the scar? There are options that work better for immature scars that have not significantly remodeled and other options for more mature scars. 

Another consideration is whether the scar is raised and discolored or more sunken and less pigmented than the surrounding skin. 

Fillers are a reasonable temporary option. Voluma and Radiesse were mentioned elsewhere as they can last for up to 2 years, but I would not recommend using these fillers in a superficial area like between the eyes or on the nose as there would be a significant risk of lumps, these products are much better suited for deep tissue augmentation in the lower face. 

I have been having good success in treating scars with platelet rich plasma treatments (PRP) injected into the scar. These are done in a series of 2-3 treatments spaced 6 weeks apart. The PRP signals the body to heal via growth factors and helps scar tissue heal to a more natural state. 

Consult with a board certified facial plastic, plastic, or oculoplastic surgeon in your area who has experience treating scars before making any decisions. 

Best wishes

Dr S

Travis L. Shaw, MD
Richmond Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

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What can I do about the deep scar between my eyes?

+2
It's impossible to give specific advice without seeing the scar or at least a photo of the scar. The options depend upon the color, width, skin quality and how the edges of the scar come together. For alot of nasal scars (as long as they're not widened) dermabrasion can be highly effective. 

Stephen Weber MD, FACS
Denver Facial Plastic Surgeon

Stephen Weber, MD, FACS
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There are many options to improve a scar.

+2
Tough to answer this question for you since you didn't include a picture.  Options are:  excise and resuture, laser, fillers - either temporary or fat.  
   

John J. Martin, Jr., MD
Coral Gables Oculoplastic Surgeon
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Possible Juvederm for scar on nose

+2
A photo of the scar on your nose would be helpful to give you the best advice.  Sometimes a scar revision can be done on a scar to improve it.  With indented scars, sometimes fillers can be used to help make the scar less noticeable.  Hyaluronic acid fillers, like Juvederm, are one option but they are relatively short lasting.  Voluma is a new hyaluronic acid filler that is stated to be longer lasting (up to 2 years) and may be a good option.  Radiesse is another filler that could be used and does last longer than Juvederm and Restylane.  

Michael I. Echavez, MD
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Flat nose after facial trauma

+2
It would be useful to have a picture, however from your description of a depressed nasal bridge, I would suggest you get another opinion as there are a number of options depending on severity and cause. It Would be important to know if it is the nasal bones or soft tissue of the skin that is injured. Options include cartilage grafting to other more permanent fillers or tissue. Consult a rhinoplasty expert and I think you will be pleased to know there are more possibilities than you have been initially told.

Arthur N. Falk, MD
Albany Facial Plastic Surgeon
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Subcision Can Permanently Elevate Depressed Scars & Microneedling Therapy Can Improve Surface Color & Texture.

+1
First let me say how sorry I feel that you are suffering so. Fortunately, there are ways to improve depressed, traumatic scars, such as the one you are describing.

Subcision can be effective for permanently elevating depressed scars of various types, including acne, chicken pox, surgical and, as in this case, traumatic scars. Subcision is a procedure in which a sterilized needle is inserted, following the administration of local anesthesia, directly beneath a depressed scar (regardless of whether from acne, infection, surgery or trauma) and used to break up the thick bands of fibrous scar tissue that bind down the surface and create the depression.

Breaking up the abnormal bands of thickened, scar collagen accomplishes two things. First, it allows the surface of the scar to float to the surface. In addition, the tissue fluid that immediately fills the space following treatment contains growth factors and other wound healing substances that promote neocollagenesis, native collagen production, that allows for improvement and elevation of the scars. Between two to four treatments, spaced at six week intervals, are generally required to promote sufficient new collagen to achieve a satisfactory improvement. Since, the collagen produced is one's own, the results of subcision are typically permanent.

Fractional microneedle therapy aka medical microneedling, which relies upon fractionated microscopic performations of the skin, works by creating numerous areas of controlled microwounding that set off in turn a cascade of events that result in new, native collagen synthesis, which translates into healthier, thicker skin that improves the appearance of the underlying scars. It is particularly useful for improving the surface tone and texture of skin to enhance blending with the surrounding normal skin. A Dermastamp is a small punch-like device that can be used for medical microneedling small areas, such as I believe may the case here. Like subcision, the results of fractional microneedle therapy are permanent. Consultation with a board certified core aesthetic physician with experience with both these treatments is an absolute must. I wish you the best of the luck.

Nelson Lee Novick, MD
New York Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.