Ask a doctor

I Am Trying to Decide What is the BEST Correction of Jowls Caused by Premature Menopause Due to Autoimmune Illness? (photo)

What is the best procedure for me and the estimated costs associated with them.

Doctor Answers (9)

Lower Face Lift And Neck Lift Best For Jowls

+6

Thank you for your question.  The most important issue is to see the physician who is taking care of your autoimmune disease and ask if you are a candidate for elective surgery.  In particular facelifting and neck lifting requires good blood supply to the face and if your autoimmune disease is interfering with your blood supply then you should not have this procedure.

Assuming your primary physician does give you medical clearance for surgery then a consideration of a lower facelift and neck lift is the best option for correction of gelling and early neck laxity.


Boston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 36 reviews

Lower Facelift is Best!

+1
The lower facelift will tighten the neck muscles, remove the excess neck fat, tighten the neck skin, lift the jowls from the jawline and lift the marionette lines. It will give you a sharper jawline.

A full facelift will achieve everything described above as well as lifting the cheeks and tightening the temple area.

You look like you would do well with a lower facelift.

If you would like more information on the different types of facelifts, please read my book "A More Beautiful You - Reverse Aging Through Skincare, Plastic Surgery and Lifestyle Solutions".

Robert M. Freund, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 19 reviews

You have several options that depend on several factors.

+1

You have several options that depend on several factors.Your medical history will determine if you are suitable for surgical versus non-surgical options.The most common surgical procedure for improving the jowls is a facelift.Non-surgical options include procedures like Ultherapy or other non-invasive lifting procedures.I would recommend you consult with a board certified Facial Plastic Surgeon to discuss your specific concerns.

James Chan, MD
Portland Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 34 reviews

You might also like...

Facial cosmetic surgery and auto-immune disease

+1

Thank you for asking about a face lift when you have autoimmune disease.

  1. The face lift depends on your auto-immune disease and medicines. Hashimoto's hypothyroidism treated with levothyroxine is no problem.
  2. In an ideal world, have a lower face and neck lift.
  3. See a Board Certified Plastic surgeon, explain your illness, plan the surgery - then your surgeon and auto-immune specialist should discuss details. Best wishes.
     

Elizabeth Morgan, MD, PhD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 22 reviews

I Am Trying to Decide What is the BEST Correction of Jowls Caused by Premature Menopause Due to Autoimmune Illness?

+1

 Let's first discuss your health as patient health and safety should always be the first concern with any treatment or plastic surgery procedure.  If you are cleared for any surgery by your rheumatologist, you would also need to off medications that thin the blood and promote bleeding as these can endanger facial skin after a facelift.

 If you meet those criteria, based on the photos provided, a minimal incision and dissection Facelift should be the only type in consideration as an added safety factor.  Using this type of facelift, excess fat can be removed from the face and neck, the SMAS dissected/lifted/trimmed and re-sutured and excess skin removed all with a 90 minute procedure, done under local injections, using smaller incisions with a rapid recovery measured in days compared to the more invasive traditional facelift.  The chin is weak and could be augmented with either a chin implant or a filler (I prefer Radiesse) if approved by your rheumatoligst.

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

AUTOIMMUNE DISEASE AND FACELIFTING

+1

Your case necessitates careful discussion with your primary doctor or rheumatologist.  As long as your endocrine system is in balance, you should be an acceptable candidate for a procedure.  Also, immune-altering medication used to treat many connective tissue disorders can affect your body's ability to heal -- as such, these need to be examined.  Judging by the photograph, I would perform a lower facelift with platymaplasty and fat removal in the neck and jowl region.

Jeffrey B. Wise, MD, FACS
Wayne Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 53 reviews

Correction of premature jowling from autoimmune disease

+1

This is a tough one! The key is if your endocrine system is in balance now - if it is, you may consider a procedure. Lower facelift may be considered if you are a satisfactory surgical candidate. Another option may be injectibles, either using an off the shelf product like Sculptra for the jowls or fat grafting. A completely accurate answer cannot be provided without an office visit with a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon who can assess your physical findings as well as your medical history and status. Best of luck!

Michele A. Shermak, MD
Baltimore Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Lower face neck lift for jowls and neck fat

+1

 A comprehensive lower face/neck lift will  elevate the jowls, tighten up the SMAS, tighten neck muscles in 3 locations, and remove fat in both the submental and subplatysmal areas. Skin tightening in the face and neck is also accomplished. It is probably best to get medical clearance from your rheumatologist prior to embarking on elective cosmetic surgery. Please see the link below to our facelift photo gallery for examples

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 58 reviews

Facelift

+1

You seem to have a complex medical history that requires in depth evaluation between your plastic surgeon and the rheumatologist, review all your medications and then decide whether you are a candidate for surgery

Samir Shureih, MD
Baltimore Plastic Surgeon

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.