How Can I Decide on What Size Implant to Get, I Need Help?

I first got silicone breast implants @20yrs ago. They were great, I was a full b cup and I was very happy with them. In 2011 I removed them due to a rupture. I did not know what size the original implants were and I could not find out because it was so long ago. I left the size up to the PS who decided on 360cc. Well they were way to large for my frame. So back in 2012 I had them reduced to 275cc and after a few months - I still feel like they are to big for me. I'm a small frame 5'6 120lbs.

Doctor Answers (8)

Reduction of Size with Implant Revision

+2

   Continuing to reduce implant size with multiple revisions can be frustrating for the patient and surgeon alike.  Make sure the change is enough of a change to merit an additional surgery.  Also, remember that continued reduction of size may create additional breast droop.


Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 219 reviews

Size Selection Depends On Several Factors.

+2
Thank you for your question. Size selection depends on several factors: 1) Patient preference, 2) Biodimensional Measurements, 3) Pictures, 4) Existing and Desired cup size
5) Size selection devices.  If all of these strategies are used and you have a thorough discussion with your surgeon, you have an excellent chance of getting to the size that you desire. Best wishes.

Robert F. Centeno, MD, FACS
Fairfax Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 33 reviews

Best Breast Implant/Profile For Me?

+2

 When it comes to selection of the “best” breast implant size/profile to meet patient's goals, the best online advice I can give to ladies who are considering revisionary breast augmentation surgery is:

1. Concentrate on choosing your plastic surgeon carefully.  Concentrate on appropriate training, certification, and the ability of the plastic surgeon to achieve the results you're looking for. Ask to see lots of examples of his/her work.


2. Have a full discussion and communication regarding your desired goals  with your plastic surgeon. This communication will be critical in determining  breast implant size/type/profile will most likely help achieve your goals. 
In my practice, the use of photographs of “goal” pictures (and breasts that are too big or too small) is very helpful. For example, I have found that the use of words such as “natural”  or “B cup” etc means different things to different people and therefore prove unhelpful.
 Also, as you know, cup size varies depending on him who makes the bra; therefore, discussing desired cup  size may also be inaccurate.


3.  Once you feel you have communicated your goals clearly,  allow your plastic surgeon to use his/her years of experience/judgment to choose the breast implant size/profile that will best meet your goals.  Again, in my practice, this decision is usually made during surgery.
  



I hope this helps.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 757 reviews

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How to choose a smaller Breast Implant

+1

There are several factors involved in choosing a breast implant: anatomical, emotional and sometimes even financial. When downsizing an implant, there is a great need to effectively communicate what your desires are to your plastic surgeon to be able to choose the implant that will better out your needs. 

Asaad H. Samra, MD
New Jersey Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

How Can I Decide on What Size Implant to Get,

+1

Downsizing is the most difficult decision for surgeons and patients. 

When patients come in for primary enlargement, trying on implants is useful. For patients wishing to be larger, a rice test can be done, in which the patient fills a stocking with raw rice until she finds the right volume, and then measures the volume needed to get there.

For patients down sizing who have saline, we can deflate the implants in the pre-op holding area until the size seems right, and then use the appropriate sized implants.  That shouldn't be done with silicone. 

Do you know if your surgeon determined the volume of your original implants when they were removed? That would be valuable info. 

Otherwise you are down to making an educated guess. I would say that it is unlikely to make a significant difference if less than 50 cc is removed. The other consideration is the condition of your skin. If there is borderline excess,  getting too small could mean you will need to consider a lift, and that might call for some compromise. 

A thorough conversation with your surgeon seems in order. Thanks for your question, best wishes. 

Jourdan Gottlieb, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Large breast implants

+1

Choosing the right size breast implant can be difficult.  I would recommend looking at different size implants before surgery, that way you have an idea beforehand.  I would not recommend letting someone else decide for you because only you know what your goals are.  The surgeon can only help guide your decision.

Dennis Dass, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 52 reviews

Implants and fram

+1

It can sometimes be difficult to get the size right when you want to downsize.  I think it is key during the exam to state exactly what you desire.  Good luck.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Breast Implant Size Selection

+1

Deciding on breast implant sizes is not straightforward.  There are many factors about the patient such as skin integrity, anatomy, fat and breast tissue distribution, current breast volume, chest diameter, etc.  There are also many factors about the implants such as volume, projection, anatomic shape versus round, silicone versus saline.  So there is not a one size fits all approach.  Our patients enjoy our VECTRA 3D breast and body analysis where they can see the results of different types and sizes of implants simulated on their own body.  We have found a very strong correlation between the VECTRA imaging and surgical results.  

 

Good Luck.

David Shafer, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 57 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.