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I'm a DDD. How Many Grams Will I Lose to Go Down to a C?

My Insurance company requires me to be 250 grams over the normative average in order for me to be covered for breast reduction surgery. I am 5"7", I weigh about 150 lbs and I wear a 38 DDD. Would I qualify?

Doctor Answers (7)

Breast Tissue Removal

+1

Without examining you in person it is difficult to say. You should definitely schedule a consultation to speak with a surgeon so he/she can properly examine you and determine if you will qualify to have your breast reduction covered by insurance.

Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Estimating the weight of breast tissue to be removed in a reduction procedure

+1

Estimating the amount of breast tissue to be removed at the time of a breast reduction is always one that must be made using sound surgical and medical judgement.  Unfortunately the insurance companies have latched upon a weight requirement for approval of a breast reduction.  This weight requirement takes in to no account surgical wound healing problems that could result from an overly reduced breast.   In general you can expect about 200 grams of breast tissue per cup size.  So given your breast size, height and weight you should meet the weight requirement.  

Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Breast tissue removal and insurance

+1

Without an exam , it is difficult to say how much tissue can be removed safely for you and so that you have  a nice shape and result. 

Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Breast implant coverage

+1
You will be way above the 250 gram requirement. In NY, it is generally a minimum of 500 grams per breast. Given that you aren't overweight, you should have no trouble getting approved for the surgery unless the insurance company has additional requirements, such as documented conservative management.
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

How Many Grams Will I Lowhen Using High Profile Implants?

+1

Bra cup letters are not sizes, they are proportions. A DDD will be different on each patient and without an examination it is not possible to give you an accurate answer. See a surgeon experienced in breast reduction surgery and he will easily be able to answer this question. It does sound like you would benefit significantly from a reduction even if the company does not pay. I find that about half of my reduction patients have to pay because they do not fit the insurance requirements, and yet they find tremendous improvement in life style after the procedure.

Portland Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Breast reduction of three cup sizes means removing at least 500 grams from each breast.

+1

Hi.

So, based on the measurements you give, you definitely qualify for a medically indicated breast reduction. DDD breasts in a tall woman like you are quite large.

Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Breast Reduction and Qualify for Insurance Coverage?

+1

Based on your description of body type and breast size, it is very likely that you are an excellent candidate for breast reduction surgery. However, it is not possible to predict whether a specific insurance company will authorize the procedure.  Furthermore, there is no direct correlation between the weight of breast tissue removed and the resulting cup size.  In my practice, I asked patients to communicate their preferred breast size/shape with the help of goal pictures.  I do not recommend that you base your communication and/or satisfaction with the outcome of surgery on achieving a specific cup size.

 Your best bet is to seek consultation with board-certified plastic surgeons. Ask to see lots of examples of their work. The plastic surgeon you select will be able to submit your information to the insurance company on your behalf.

 Best wishes.

 

Web reference: http://www.poustiplasticsurgery.com/Procedures/Procedure_breastReduction.htm

San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 625 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.

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