Ask a doctor

5 Days Post Op Tummy Tuck and Wondering if my Surgeon Went About It the Wrong Way? (photo)

I'm 5 days post-op from tummy tuck surgery (after a 121lb weight loss) and I'm not really happy with my belly button. I'm happy with everything else but that.. and I'm wondering if the surgeon should have done a full anchor cut on me. I'm wondering if you think my belly button has a chance in improving as far as looks because it looks like there is still excess skin around that area. (Including a before shot as well)

Doctor Answers (7)

Appearance of belly button 1 week post-op

+3

I agree with you that there is still excessive laxity of the skin around the navel, and this creates the pleated, indented look that you are seeing.  In addition, your scar is positioned slightly high allowing for upward distraction of your pubic area.  You had quite a bit of laxity of skin before surgery, and these situations present quite a challenge for a tummy tuck surgeon.  At 1 week post-op, however, it is difficult to tell just to what degree these things will continue as it is very, very early.  Some of this may change with time, and some may persist, leading to a discussion with your surgeon about possible revision options.  At this point, the best thing to do is to allow things to heal, swelling to resolve, and tissue tensions to equilibrate, and this may take several months.  Only then can an accurate assessment of these things be made.  Good luck.


San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Don't worry about the appearance of the navel one week after abdominoplasty.

+2

Because of swelling the navel can look very unusual for several weeks after in abdominoplasty. The gathering up of the tissue around the navel in the picture should get significantly better as the swelling improves.

Vincent N. Zubowicz, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Early post operative result following abdominoplasty for massive weight loss

+2

You are still very early in the post operative healing period.  I would certainly give it another 3 months before you start to judge your results. Be patient, most of the swelling will subside and you may find that the area around your umbilicus also gets better with time. 

Jeffrey Zwiren, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

You might also like...

5 Days Post Op Tummy Tuck

+2

Jess--Thanks for your question, but I am not sure I understand all of it. The photo certainly demonstrates a nice overall improvement, as you note. What I don't know is what exactly was done, and what you define as an anchor cut. 

It looks like there may be a vertical incision in the lower abdomen, presumably to remove some horizontal excess, but I am not certain.

At any rate, there is usually enough swelling to make any judgement of appearance difficult. Patience. 

At the worst, if the outcome is not satisfactory, a minor touch up should make it OK. All the best. 

Jourdan Gottlieb, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 30 reviews

5 Days Post Op Tummy Tuck and Wondering if my Surgeon Went About It the Wrong Way?

+1

ONLY 5 days post operative! At least allow 3 months of healing before becoming so concerned. These issues should be addressed with your chosen surgeon. 

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 61 reviews

Results 5 Days after Tummy Tuck

+1

After only 5 days, the results you see are not the final results. Thing will likely improve after the swelling resolves, which takes a few months.

Karol A. Gutowski, MD, FACS
Ohio Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Wrinkles in the Belly Button

+1

Thank you for the photos.  It is too early to tell. Once the swelling has subsided then the belly button may have a different look.

Dr. ES

Earl Stephenson, Jr., MD, DDS
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.