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25% TCA for Back Scars (Dark Skin)?

I Am a Darked Skinned Person Thinking of Using a 25% Tca for Scars on my Back. is this strength too weak? too strong? should I be doing any thing before I use this? what should I put on after ward? some people have suguested savlon?

Doctor Answers (4)

25% TCA is for trained professionals only

+1

Your scars may bother you but you could do more damage treating yourself--especially with TCA. Go to a board-certified dermatologist or plastic surgeon who is experienced in treating dark skin.


New York Dermatologist
3.5 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Using TCA 25% Peel To Treat Scars

+1

I would not recommend a TCA 25% peel for your back scars. In a darker skin tone, this could very well lead to hyper-pigmentation. As a safe and more effective option, I might recommend that you seek consultation for a Fraxel treatment of the scars. This would be a far more reliable way to achieve improvement and should only be done by a skilled laser surgeon.  This would also depend on the type of scars that you have on your back. Are they raised scars, or depressed? Are they light scars, or dark? Are they keloidal? This really requires a thorough consultation with a derm laser surgeon.  TCA 25% Peel is not likely to yield a good result on the back.

David Colbert, MD
New York Dermatologic Surgeon
2.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

No, no, no

+1

As said earlier, do not treat yourself.  25% TCA on the back of a dark skinned person is a recipe for disaster.  Go see a dermatologist or plastic surgeon and have it done correctly.

Brent Spencer, MD
Frisco Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

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TCA peel

+1

Do not treat yourself

See a plastic surgeon. Back peels are very difficult even for experts

Samir Shureih, MD
Baltimore Plastic Surgeon

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