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Re: Why Do They Cut the Nape of Your Neck when Having a Facelift.

I had a few reply's about this and most of them said that it was because I must have had alot of loose skin where my neck was and I did. The only thing is alot of skin was taken away but after only 1 month my neck and jowls are coming back. I look the same as I did before this surgery. Someone said I have to wait 6 months to have this fixed, is this true & why? Can my neck and jowls be tightened and what is the best procedure for this. Thank you.

Doctor Answers (11)

Face Lift, Mini Face Lift, The Palmer Celebrity Face Lift, Beverly Hills Face Lift

+1

Face Lift incisions that continue behind the crease, of the ear, into the posterior hair are for full Neck Lifts to tighten and remove excess skin of the neck.  If performed properly, the neck should remain tight for 5,7 years or longer.  If you're sagging already, you may wish to see an experienced face lift surgeon for a consultation.


Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Facial relaxation after a facelift

+1

In patients who have significant tissue sagging, a secondary facelift may be necessary. Remember, one of the key factors for the surgeon is improving your look without creating a deformity.  Sometimes there is only so much that can be removed at one time. There are some patients whom require the severe laxity be removed in a staged manner. 

Marc Schneider, MD
Fort Myers Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

A facelift is not a facelift

+1
There are a variety of facelift procedures. Some are more rejuvenating than others. I don't know why an incision was made in the nape of your neck, and I don't know whether that was the best technique for your particular anatomy without examining you personally. More than likely it was the best technique. Everyone has differences in their elasticity of their skin and everyone reacts differently to surgery. I would recommend discussing your concerns with your surgeon. See if there is something that can improve this problem area.
Andrew C. Campbell, M.D.
Board Certified Facial Plastic Surgeon
 

Andrew Campbell, MD
Milwaukee Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

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Early recurrence after facelift

+1

The main reasons for an early recurrence after a facelift are if you have terrible skin elasticity from sun damage or massive weight loss or acne scarring.  Otherwise, it is possible that your tissues needed to be undermined farther to redrape them.  In my experience, unless you go all the way across the neck undermining, you will see less result in the midline area after about 6 months.

Richard P. Rand, MD, FACS
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Why must I wait for touch up face lift plastic surgery?

+1

Scar tissues must "mature" prior to repeated surgery. This means that normal anatomic planes are restored to some degree that permits tissues to be properly and adequtely dissected, mobilized, repositioned and secured.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
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Redo Facelift

+1

I think an important consideration in any facelift surgery is the quality of the skin and underlying muscle.  If the skin is heavily damaged from sun damage, smoking, and genetic reasons, the result will always be less than ideal.  It is important for your surgeon to discuss this with you beforehand, such that realistic expectations and results are ensured.   I typically refrain from revision neck contouring for 12 months to ensure the tissues are soft/pliable and to maximize my opportunity to provide the optimal correction.   All the best in a safe recovery!!

 

Paul S. Gill, M.D.

Gill Plastic Surgery

Houston Double Board Certified Plastic Surgeon

Paul S. Gill, MD
Houston Plastic Surgeon
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Facelift - nape of neck

+1

If you had a lot of loose skin and have strechy skin, it's not uncommon to get return of some laxity especially in your chin area.  Anatomically there's only so much pulling you can you in a facelift surgery.  

Dr. Cat Begovic M.D.

Catherine Huang-Begovic, MD
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Redo face lift

+1

The neck skin can be very difficult to completely treat. The skin of the neck may lack the elasticity that it once had and therefore after a facelift can sometimes loosen prematurely.

Steven Wallach, MD
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Patient's with a lot of excess neck skin and poor elasticity may need a "double lift"

+1

After years of experience with all types of neck lifts, it has become apparent to me that some patients may need to have a "double lift" if they have poor elasticity of neck skin or genetically poor skin.  (Leos-Daniels Syndrome).  There is a limit on how much tension you can place on any lift without creating loss of circulation and the true disaster of Necrosis. You can sometimes determine this in advance in patients who have a family history of poor aging, massive weight loss, or early drop-out of a prior neck lift. These patient's are told in advance that they may require a second touch up lift after 8-10 months. (You need to wait that long for the tissues to settle down and become more pliable so the lift works best.).  However after over 1000 face lifts, I cannot always determine this in advance. Fortunately the second lift can use the same incisions and can usually be done in the office with a very quick recovery.  (The tissues have already been trained to heal).

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Nathan Mayl, MD
Fort Lauderdale Plastic Surgeon
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Neck incisions

+1

The extent of face & neck lift incisions needed depends on how much laxity there is and where the laxity is.  With severe neck laxity the incisions in the back of the beck can be extensive

Sam Naficy, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
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These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.