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I'm currently breastfeeding and I want to try Botox. Is pumping and dumping an option? How many days should I do that for?

Can I have botox and then pump and dump my breast milk for a couple days just to be safe? How many days should I refrain from breastfeeding? I can give the baby breast milk that Ive stored up until its safe. I'm aware that even though no known side effects have been passed to the breatfed baby in cases nor has botox been detected in the breast milk but still most Doctors dont recomend it.

Doctor Answers (6)

I'm currently breastfeeding and I want to try Botox. Is pumping and dumping an option? How many days should I do that for?

+1

There are currently no studies to show the effects of Botox on pregnant or nursing women. In theory it probably will not cause harm however no one recommends continuing cosmetic procedures, such as Botox, will pregnant or nursing. Botox stays in your body much longer than a couple of days (3-4 months usually) so "pumping and dumping" is not really an option. I strongly suggest you stop treatments while breastfeeding and I think you will be hard-pressed to find a doctor who will inject Botox during pregnancy or breastfeeding.

Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 87 reviews

Botox and breastfeeding

+1

It is not advisable to get Botox while you are breastfeeding. "Pump and dump" is not an option simply because the Botox is in your body for 3-4 months - it's not just an immediate thing. We don't and won't do tests on pregnant or breastfeeding women. While the true effects are unknown and its thought to be safe, would you in any way want to risk the health of your baby or the nutrition you are trying to supply your child? No. So it's best to just wait for cosmetic procedures until you are done breastfeeding.

"This answer has been solicited without seeing this patient and cannot be held as true medical advice, but only opinion. Seek in-person treatment with a trained medical professional for appropriate care."

Las Vegas Dermatologist
4.5 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

I'm currently breastfeeding and I want to try Botox. Is pumping and dumping an option?

+1

Unfortunately, this is not an option. We don't know enough about breastfeeding and Botox to be able to make recommendations. The only safe option is to wait until you've stopped breast feeding to try out Botox treatments. I hope this information is helpful.

Stephen Weber MD, FACS

Web reference: http://weberfacialplasticsurgery.com/botox-dysport-xeomin-neuromodulators

Denver Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

I'm currently breastfeeding and I want to try Botox. Is pumping and dumping an option? How many days should I do that for?

+1

It's not recommended doing cosmetic procedures while pregnant or breast feeding. I advise you to wait until youre done breast feeding

Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 147 reviews

Don't get Botox while you're breast feeding

+1

I can't imagine a doctor administering Botox when a patient is pregnant or breast feeding. Wait until you are done breast feeding before trying Botox.

Web reference: Http://www.dkhoffmanmd.com

Los Gatos Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

While it's certainly not recommended to get botox while breastfeeding, obviously the

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issue has not been well studied...the amount of botox used for cosmetic purposes is relatively small so it's dilution in the body drastically lowers the amount potentially available in the breast milk...and of course the blood concentration is extremely low and basically unmeasurable a short while after treatment...so with this in mind, if there's some over-powering reason why you want to get your botox during this period, then probably avoidance of breastfeeding for a few days after injection is most likely very safe...but is the very low, infinitesimal, negligible, potential risk worth any lingering anxiety over whether you made the right choice?

Las Vegas Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.

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