Why Am I Crying All the Time After 2 Weeks After Breast Lift and Boob Job?

Why Am I Crying All the Time After 2 Weeks After Breast Lift and Boob Job?

Doctor Answers (6)

Adjusting to body image after cosmetic surgery, including breast lift with implants, can be stressful

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First, make sure you see your plastic surgeon in follow up and give consideration to seeing your primary care physician to help get you set up to see a counselor during this very stressful time for you.

Please keep in mind that it is very early in your recovery.  I don't know what your results look like right now but it takes a good 2-3 months for the swelling to leave and for the implants to settle into the pocket.

Also know that it takes scars about a year to settle down.

For more specific information, you really should stay in close contact and have frequent visits with you plastic surgeon.

Best of luck. I hope this helps.

 


Nashville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Crying after surgery

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With any stress that you have in your life, your adrenal glands respond with a "fight or flight" reaction by dumping catacholamines into your blood stream.  About one to three weeks later you have a "let down" where your body is trying to build up the stores of these important chemicals back into you adrenal glands, so your blood levels dip a bit.  This is physiologic, and very normal after any stress.  You see it with postpartum, and after elective surgery all the time. This usually only lasts about 3 weeks.  You are not alone.  Just know that it will pass.  Put yourself around those that are very uplifting and supportive of you for this time.  A negative comment at this time when you are vulnerable could do way more damage than it should.  Good luck.

Dan Mills, MD
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Crying after Breast Augmentation/Lifting?

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I'm sorry to hear about the tough time you are having after your surgery.

You should be aware that it is not unusual for patients to undergo significant emotional “ups and downs” after any type of surgery. Surgery of any kind carries a significant amount of stress with it;  again, it is not unusual to see patients undergo “post operative depression” that  generally resolves after a few weeks.  The  surgical related stress may be compounded/increased if there are other significant stressors occurring in your life at this point.

I would suggest that you communicate your experience with your plastic surgeon who knows you and your situation best and may be able to provide specific guidance,  depending on the specific “stressors” that may be present in your life. If necessary, counseling may also be helpful.

Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 679 reviews

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Crying, Depression and Emotional roller coaster following Cosmetic Surgery

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 The first weeks can be really difficult– physically and especially emotionally after any cosmetic surgery and breast augmentation is no exception  Assuming your surgery went well this may be a normal reaction. Although several factors may be involved causing this including underlying stress, medications, psychological tendencies, etc - many women experience a sequence of emotional feelings "Emotional Rollercoaster" following aesthetic surgery - but it does pass. Having a  partner, family member , or friend  who  is supportive can help this process.The stages of emotional ups and downs if understood in advance  can help you stay  calm and get you through this process more quickly.

Phase 1 –  Being Out of It

Swelling and discomfort is most severe over the first few days after breast augmentation. Pain medications also can make you disoriented and emotional.

Phase 2 – Mood Swings
Having just had breast augmentation you are adjusting to  a sudden change in your appearance with much anticipation.. The presence of  bruising, swelling, and edema, your breasts aren't going to be look like the final outcome. Mood swings especially sadness, worry and depression are common.You may even ask: "What have I done?" or think that "I never should have done it" 

Phase 3   Being over critical
During the second week you  will probably be feeling a lot better. The edema (swelling) and muscle cramping/spasms if implants were under the muscle  will be decreasing and stiches out.. Because  of anticipation it is natural for you to look critiacally at your new breasts  worrying about symmetry, scars, and so on. . So; it's normal  to wonder if  you acheived your goal and "what you paid for" .  This is too soon to tell and most concerns are resolved with time. 

Phase 4 Happy at last
Finally,  about  week 3 or so, you will probably start liking how you look and are feeling much better.. You may be in the mood to buy your new bra to check out the size difference, check out some bathing suits or tops to show off your new figure and show off.

Larry Nichter, MD, MS, FACS

Larry S. Nichter, MD, MS, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

Hard to know

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We know that there is such a thing as post surgical depression.  We learned this from pregnant women who have post partem depression following their delivery.  This is serious business. I recommend that you see a psychologist or a psychiatrist to be sure you don't need an anti-depressant and an evaluation of your mental health.

E. Anthony Musarra II, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Unhappy With Breast Surgery

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I am not sure how to answer a question as serious as this with no information. Not everyone is pleased with their results and often that comes from expecting results that can't be obtained. Other times there may be friends or family that are creating the unhappiness. I hope you will reask your question and include pre and post op photos, front and side views as well as the specifics of what you wanted done and what the actual procedure was.

Ronald V. DeMars, MD
Portland Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.