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Crown Hair Transplant: How Do You Best Ensure That a Double Whirl is Naturally Recreated?

Recently I had the chance to interact with a few (previous) clients at a hair transplant clinic. While most were happy with their end results (a year or more later), one common complaint was regarding the whorl recreation - especially double whorls, which are apparently very tricky to recreate perfectly. I am concerned because I have a double whorl, and am considering a transplant soon. What are the techniques that my surgeon should be aware of, for re-creating the perfect double whorl?

Doctor Answers (4)

Creating a Double Whorl - Hair Transplant

+1

Ensuring that you end up with a natural-looking double whorl means choosing a talented surgeon with extensive crown restoration experience. Creating two whorls amid the crown is technically no different than creating one, just possibly more tedious. However, you can keep doing what you’re doing: talk to prior patients, review sample photo and video results, even find a double whorl hair transplant recipient who is satisfied and check out his surgeon.


Redondo Beach Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 22 reviews

Double Whorl in Hair Transplant

+1

I agree that creating a double whorl is not technically more demanding than creating a single whorl.  Your surgeon should be able to assess your hair growth patterns, as well as loss and plan the optimal transplant with you to get you the most natural results.   

Angela Sturm, MD
Houston Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Hair transplant for double wh

+1

If the surgeon does not know how to do this why would you go to him.  Having done these for 35

years and taught all over the world it all boils down to "of you have to tell the tailor

Toby Mayer, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

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Whorl creation in crown hair transplant

+1

The double whorl should be no more difficult to create than a single one. You should be sure that your potential for hair loss is not great so you will not use up precious limited donor material for reconstructing the crown when you may need the hair for the more critical front area. Unless you are in your 60's, baldness may not likely be limited.  

Sheldon S. Kabaker, MD
Oakland Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.