Crooked Nose After Septorhinoplasty - 3 Months Later? (photo)

I had Rhinoplasty - Septoplasty to "straighten" my broken nose 3 months ago. I think my nose still looks almost the same as before the surgery other than taking the hump away. It has been 3 months already and my surgeon say there is nothing more he can do. Will my nose look better and be more centered once any swelling that is still left goes away? One Nostril is still larger than the other, can this be corrected? Where should I go from here?

Doctor Answers (5)

Postoperative swelling after rhinoplasty can last for several months, but minor revisions may be possible

+2

Thank you for posting your question.  It is still relatively early in your healing process, and swelling after rhinoplasty can last for up to one year.   It would be helpful to see your "before" preoperative photos for comparison to see if you had any baseline asymmetry.  Close follow up with your plastic surgeon is important so that he/she can see the evolution of the healing and make any appropriate recommendations along the way.  It is possible to reduce the size of the nostrils, or perhaps just one nostril in order to improve the symmetry, however this should be evaluated in person.  In some patients with underlying midfacial asymmetry, building out the "foundation" of the nose with filler into the medial cheek can help improve the nasal base symmetry as well. 

Best wishes and good luck to you in your recovery!


San Francisco Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Crooked Nose After Septorhinoplasty - 3 Months Later?

+1

                 The nose could still be maturing for up to a year or more.  Swelling will depend upon the nature of maneuvers employed, presence of grafts or implants, thickness of skin, open vs closed etc.

Kenneth Hughes, MD

Los Angeles, CA

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 177 reviews

Still crooked after rhinoplasty

+1

Straightening a broken nose or a fractured septum is more difficult than first time rhinoplasty. The septum often will have 'memory' and tend to resume its original shape unless very well supported. Now wait out full healing and then decide if the imperfection is worth going after.

Peter E. Johnson, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

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It might get a little better.

+1

Hello dth,

Thanks for your question.  You are still only about 25% done with your nasal healing.  Alot can change in the next 9 months.  It typically takes a year for a nose to finish healing after surgery.  Gentle pressure by taping, along with soft tissue massage may further shape your nose over the next several months.  Remember that your nose was traumatized twice: once by the break and then the second time by the surgery to fix it.  Depending on your normal amount of pretraumatic asymmetry, you will probably have some postoperative asymmetry as well.  After a year, if you don't like the position of your nose or the shape of your nostrils, I suggest you consult with a specialist in revision rhinoplasty about your options both surgical and nonsurgical.

Good luck,

Dr. Shah

Manish H. Shah, MD, FACS
Denver Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 19 reviews

3 Months Post Op Rhinoplasty

+1

It is VERY important to follow up with your Plastic Surgeon regarding your recovery.  It takes months for all the swelling to go down, but in some cases minor revisions are needed.  Usually these revisions are done in an office setting with very little recovery time needed.  Your Plastic Surgeon will know if this is necessary, as healing from the septo-rhinoplasty can take months.  Discuss these and all questions with your Plastic Surgeon, as he is the best one to guide you to recovery. Best wishes!

Robert E. Zaworski, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.