Cost to Reduce Hanging Columella?

So I have a hanging columella and I hate it. I like the rest of my nose except that and thats all I want done. I heard most they time all they do is shave off some of the cartilage right there and sometimes they can do it in the office under local anesthesia. So my question is, just to reduce the hanging columella, how much does that procedure normally cost? I have a consultation on the 23rd, but I'm just really curious.

Doctor Answers (3)

Cost of columella reduction

+1

The procedure to reduce a hanging columella involves trimming back both skin and cartilage along the columella.  This can be done either under a local or a general anesthesia as long as the remainder of the nose is well balanced.  The cost of performing the procedure varies from approximately $2,600 under local anesthesia to $3,500 under general anesthesia.


Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 58 reviews

Treatment for hanging columella

+1

Sometimes an isolated hanging columella can be treated in the office using only local anesthesia.  However, it is always best to have your nose imaged to see how this change may appear.  You might find that there are several other improvements that can be made to provide you with the look that you desire.  Make sure that your surgeon takes a special interest in rhinoplasty.  He or she should be able to provide you with many photos of his/her work during your consultation. 

Scott Chapin, MD
Philadelphia Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Cosmetic surgery pricing varies widely

+1

The price varies from surgeon to surgeon and from region to region.  It will probably be more than you might think if you go to an excellent surgeon.  But remember, going cheap may lead to unfixable complications so never scrimp when it comes to your face.

Richard P. Rand, MD, FACS
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 49 reviews

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These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.