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I Am Having Eye Muscle Botox Injection Soon, How Long Before It's Safe to Travel by Airplane?

The procedure is relaxing the inside muscle, due to pulling/pain on outside muscle. small amount to be injected. I know that it takes a few days to "settle" into correct location, but also I imagine changes in pressure might affect absorption etc - so how long do I need to wait before flying? (1day? 1week? 1month? etc) Thanks!

Doctor Answers (19)

Botox enters the muscles very quickly...there's no travel restriction after therapy...

+1

if you go straight from the doctor's office to the airport, even if there were no TSA, you'd be fine...hope you have a good trip


Las Vegas Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

No flying restrictions after Botox injections

+1

I know of no contraindicatin to flying after a Botox injection.  The main precaution is not to rub the area for 4 hours.  

Jeffrey Zwiren, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Eye muscle Botox injection

+1

Injecting Botox into the extraocular muscles for  treatment of what I presume is spasm, is something that you should ask you eye doctor about. He may want you to stay in town for a few days to a week to see how it responded.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

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Botulinum toxin (Dysport and Botox) for eye muscles and how long before airplane traveling is permissible.

+1

There are two issues here: 1) Q: When is it safe to fly? A: Probably anytime after 24 hours to ensure that no unusual bleeding 2) Q: When is it wise ot fly? A: If you are traveling for the treatment and want to ensure that you have achieved the desired result, it may be wise to wait around for about 2 weeks in the event you need a touch up injection.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 48 reviews

Botox and Traveling

+1

Great question...Botox enters the nerves at the site of injection within 90 to 120 minutes after injection. The action on the muscle takes approximately 3-5 days to become evident and typically 2 weeks to settle completely. There is not contraindication to flying after a Botox injection, especially if it is a "small" amount". 

Good Luck!

Dr. C

johnconnorsmd.com

John Philip Connors III, MD, FACS
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Botox - when is it safe to fly

+1

There are no contraindications to flying with Botox.  It is recommended not to exercise the same day to keep the Botox from migrating but flying should be no problem.

Dr. Cat Begovic M.D.

Catherine Huang-Begovic, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

It Is safe to travel after BOTOX injections

+1

The botulinum toxin is picked up very quickly by the muscle, we tell our patients 30-60 minutes. The actual effect may take several days to show up but the process begins very quickly. I have no restrictions for our patients with flying, lying flat, etc.

Brian Maloney, MD, FACS
Atlanta Facial Plastic Surgeon
3.5 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Air travel after Botox to Eye Muscle

+1

Air travel should not have any effect on your botox injection. However, it sounds like you are having botox injected into one of your extraocular muscles for double vision. In that case, it may be worth while to wait a few days to see the effect of the injection so as not to impair or disrupt your use of both eyes.

Carlo Rob Bernardino, MD
Monterey Oculoplastic Surgeon
3.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

Can I fly after having Botox?

+1

Hi Cali2DC.  It's perfectly fine to fly after having Botox or any injection procedure for that matter.  

Harold J. Kaplan, MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Botox injections and flying

+1

There are no contraindication for flying after Botox injections. The only precaution is not to massage the injected area for about 1hr. following the injection. 

Henri P. Gaboriau, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.