Conflicting Advice Regarding Removing my Chin Implant and Leaving the Capsule Empty, What to Do?

There are a LOT of conflicting reports here on implant removal and what happens AFTER. This is so confusing and distressing for a patient - all agree that removal is straightforward (silicone) but beyond that it seems to be a very grey area - some say the scar tissue will be fine and augment the area nicely, others say it will likely contract into an unsightly ball, then others say it has a slippery surface and so the chin plate will fall and overhang. Why cant surgeons agree on this issue?

Doctor Answers (5)

Chin Implant Capsule Management

+2

The issue with chin implant removal is not whether the capsule needs to be removed, because it doesn't. The more relevant issue is whether the soft tissue of the chin needs to be resuspended from above or tucked from below to prevent ptosis or a witch's chin deformity. In this situation, a part of the capsule may need to be removed to assist in the soft tissue redraping. That decision is influenced by a number of factors, primarily being the size of the implant.


Indianapolis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

Removal of Chin Implant

+2

I cannot explain why you have received differing opinions about the removal of your silicone chin implant. However if it is necessary to remove the implant, it is unlikely you will have complications after surgery. I have removed a chin implant once and scar tissue did provide some augmentation after the operation.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Removing Chin Implant

+2
First it depends on why you are removing it? Is it to big, is the placement not right, is the shape due to the wrong implant type for your anatomy, how long have you had the implant in?All of these questions need to be reviewed in a proper evaluation to figure out the best diagnosis and surgical plan. These issues add up to the diversity in opinions. In general when removing an implant the patient should be fine. I have only removed a few implants in my 30 plus years of practice the ones I have removed the patients have done fine with no contracture etc. You will have some scar tissue there which would lead possibly to a more augmented look then you had prior to your procedure. A good examination and full discussion with your surgeon should help alleviate the disparity between surgeons. Remember each patient is different and has to be handled accordingly for the best aesthetically pleasing result.

Michael Elam, MD
Orange County Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 132 reviews

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Chin implant removal

+1

In my experience the scar capsule shouldn't need to be removed. It is important to re-suspend the chin soft tissue properly with sutures after implant removal to prevent chin drooping. The other issue relates to how large the implant is that is being removed and how long it was in place.

Thomas A. Lamperti, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

What To Expect Once a Chin Implant is Removed

+1

Surgeons can't agree on  this issue because there is so much variability with the results. When a chin implant is removed there will be some scar tissue that will fill the defect left after the implant is removed. In some people very little scar forms, leaving an obvious lack of tissue. In others, a fair amount of scar forms, making the defect less noticeable. My experience has been that most people do not get enough scar tissue to fill the defect following removal of the implant to give them a satisfactory result. However, if you are removing the implant because it looks too big, you may be happy with the small amount of scar tissue that forms after the removal. 

Michael R. Menachof, MD, FACS
Denver Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.