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Should I Be Concerned That One Breast Has Dropped Faster Than the Other and I'm Still Uneven at 5 Months? (photo)

In May of this year I received saline breast implants under the muscle. My breast were slightly uneven before surgery and he placed a HP 425 cc filled to a 465 cc in my left breast and another 425 cc filled to a 485 in my right. My left has progressively dropped my right remains stubborn. My left is very soft and my right remains firmer and tighter. I was given a strap to wear. Should I just continue with the strap every night and allow gravity to take it's course? I try to go without a bra.

Doctor Answers (7)

Asymmetric breasts tend to heal at slightly different rate

+2

Hello,

Since your breasts were asymmetric before surgery the tissues of each breast were slightly different.  This is compounded with the possibility that the surgery was also performed asymmetrically.  It is still early enough that additional changes can be seen.  At some point you will stop seeing changes in your breasts and will have to decide if the difference that you see at that point is acceptable or if you would prefer to revise the surgery for improved symmetry.

All the best,

Dr Repta


Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 82 reviews

Right breast wont drop

+2

One thing you might try doing is to wear your breast strapat nite with a roll of cloth or foam rubber over the top of the right implant to put more pressure on that side and see if you can get it to drop more.In 32 years I have never met a symmetrical person.

Robert Brueck, MD
Fort Myers Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Early Breast Assymetry

+2

It is no surprise that your right breast feels harder than your left.   The implant was expanded more.   I use a breast strap in my post-operative patients.  I also encourage post-surgical massage.   It is not uncommon for slight breast asymmetry.   Tinture of time!   It is hard to have patience when you are the patient.

Jonathan Berman, MD
Palm Beach Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

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Asymmetry

+2

It looks like you have very mild asymmetry of the two breasts.  This is normal!!  One breast may always fell a bit tighter unless you have a capsular contracture.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
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Concerned wih Symmetry of Breast Augmentation

+2
You are likely to have some contiued change in the shape of your breasts for a full year, soyou may not be at your final outcome. Your photos show a very good result with a normal variation between the two sides. "Perfect" symmetry never happens in real time.

Mary Lee Peters, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
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Breast Asymmetry after Breast Augmentation?

+2

Thank you for the question.

Unless you have developed early encapsulation (firm/tight abnormal scar tissue around the breast implant) you should not be concerned about the  slight asymmetry that exists at this point. You will find that the breasts will continue to change for several more months.

I would suggest continued follow-up with your plastic surgeon as well as realization that the breasts may never be identical.

I hope this helps.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 684 reviews

Implants dropping at different rates.

+1

Thank you for your question. Although you had the same operation with slightly different implant volumes, each breast is going to recover independent of the other. It is not uncommon for one implant to drop earlier than the other. However, if you have persistent firmness of the right breast, this may be the signs of a capsular contracture. An obvious sign would be an elevation of the right implant. Continue with your plastic surgeon's recommendations and maintain a close followup. Many times, simple maneuvers such as a bandeau/strap or massage are all that's needed to improve the symmetry.

David Bogue, MD
Boca Raton Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.