Composite Grafts in Rhinoplasty; Possible Under Local Anesthesia?

I´m interested in a revision rhinoplasty procedure where I would have my nostrils lowered by composite grafting. If this is the only thing I need, can this be done under local anesthesia? How many mm can the nostrils be lowered in this way? If surgery is limited to this, how much would it approximately cost? How do I find a surgeon who is experienced in this procedure?

Doctor Answers (8)

Composite grafts in rhinoplasty

+1

Although composite grafts certainly can be done under local anesthesia, it is not advisable as the patient will be uncomfortable.  Composite grafts require numbing the entire nasal tip of the nose and ears.  For patient safety and comfort, it is best to have this done under general anesthesia.


Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 58 reviews

Lowering the nostril rim

+1

Yes composite cartilage and skin from the ear can be used to lower the retracted nostril rim. This could be done under local but you might be more comfortable with some sedation. Cost would be around $6500 .

Thomas Buonassisi, MD
Vancouver Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 58 reviews

Composite Grafts in Rhinoplasty; Possible Under Local Anesthesia?

+1

 If you are referring to "alar notching" repair using rim based composite ear grafts then yes, this can be done quite easily under a local anesthesia and does not require a Rhinoplasty. 

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

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Composite Tip Grafts Under Local Anesthesia

+1

Composite grafts, composed of cartilage and skin, or just cartilage grafts can be used to lower the nostril rims. Over the past 35 years I've found that only cartilage is needed in most cases. Using just local anesthesia the cost will vary between $6,000-9,000. 

Richard W. Fleming, MD
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Nostril correction under local?

+1

Using a composite graft is often the way to go to lower the retracted nostrils. It is probably best to have this done under sedation.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
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Revision Rhinoplasty

+1

It is impossible to tell how many mm you can lower your nostrils without a photo or examination. You can expect some lowering with composite grafting but no one can tell you how much without seeing you even then it's a good guesstimate. I would not advise doing this procedure under local anesthesia it will be uncomfortable for you as well as the surgeon. This would be best done under local and IV sedation. If you are only doing the nostril lowering and nothing else the most the procedure should be is $10,000.00 including the operating room and anesthesia. Be sure to have your procedure done with a Board Certified Facial Plastic Surgeon who does noses and facial work every day. This is intricate work that requires a different skill set than a General Plastic Surgeon.

David Alessi, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
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Lower nostrils is it possible

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I won the award from the Aesthetic society in 2005 for my article on this procedure. It is a simple procedure which inserts a cartilage into the rim and can be done under local.I charge $12000 since I started the procedure and have the most experience in it

Richard Ellenbogen, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Composite Grafts in Rhinoplasty; Possible Under Local Anesthesia?

+1

Hi,

It would be possible to do this procedure under local anasthesia. I would suggest have mild sedation: versed and fentanyl. Its very difficult to tell mm with see at least pics of your nose. I would say that this procedure cost can vary from 6500 to 12000 depending where you are.

Best,

Dr.S.

Oleh Slupchynskyj, MD, FACS
New York Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 213 reviews

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