Why Am I Having Complications With My Left Breast Implant 11 Yrs Later? (photo)

I'm 31 yrs old w/ 3 children.... Have had no problems w/ my implants after having them for 11 yrs, until now! Started two days ago w/ sharp pains throughout the day ... Today the left side hurts to touch & the outer side as well as the bottom is swollen, hard & of course rippling !! .. A Lot of Pain,  Red Streaks and Very Swollen As Well As Rippling. Please advise me on what I should do .... Thanks

Doctor Answers (8)

Complications With My Left Breast Implant 11 Yrs Later?

+1

Unfortunately, complications - including infection - can occur at any time, including eleven years after the original surgery.  You need to be seen by your surgeon or, if not available, another surgeon, to rule this out.  If you do have an infection, it will need to be treated.  Either way, you should not delay having this addressed.  Hopefully it will respond to antibiotics or even resolve on its own; but you can't rely on that alone.

Sorry,

Dr. E


New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 150 reviews

Acute symptoms 11 years later

+1

suggests something concerning is happening.  You should see a local surgeon, preferably your surgeon if he/she is still around.  If you have inflammation, redness, marked swelling, and fevers, this is an urgent issue.

Curtis Wong, MD
Redding Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

See a plastic surgeon asap

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You may be having an infection of the breast which means you need to see a plastic surgeon ASAP and be examined and treated.

Andre Aboolian, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

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Breast pain and redness

+1

Even after 11 years, you  may have an infection in your breast implant.  Best to be seen ASAP by a plsatic surgeon.  Good luck.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

BREAST PAIN

+1

Thanks for the photos.  It is not clear from your photos what the problem is.  I would recommend you see your plastic surgeon or another plastic surgeon ASAP.  An infection of the breast/implant needs to be addressed quickly..

Todd B. Koch, MD
Buffalo Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Infection after breast augmentation

+1

Dear Jenn. Sorry to hear about your problem, but it definitely sounds like you have a breast infection (mastitis) which may or may not involve your left implant.  Tiny cracks in the nipples can introduce bacteria into the breasts which lead to infection.  Sometimes, dental procedures can send bacteria into the bloodstream which can lodge around your implants.  Regardless of the cause, you should go see a plastic surgeon (not your primary doctor) ASAP.  IF you can't get in to see a plastic surgeon soon, go to your local ER or Urgent Care Center today to be evaluated.  They usually have a plastic surgeon on-call to cover emergencies.   If you delay treatment and the infection reaches the implant, you may have to have the implant(s) removed for 3 months until the infection clears.

Victor Ferrari, MD, FACS
Charlotte Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 19 reviews

Late Complication could be infection

+1

This sounds like your implant is infected.  This is a serious situation and you need to see your plastic surgeon right away.

Mark A. Schusterman, MD
Houston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 63 reviews

Late complications with breast implant

+1

Of course it is not possible to make a diagnosis based on a picture and brief description, however I would recommend that you see your surgeon for an exam. The description of the swelling, pain and red streaking seem to indicate some infection of the breast. This may or may not involve your implant. Either way, if it is an infection it should be treated with antibiotics.

 

Eugene J. Sidoti, Jr., MD
Scarsdale Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.