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Is It Common to Still Have Pain 2 Years After a Tummy Tuck

I occasionally still have pain in my stomach.. more like discomfort. it ranges from a burning feeling, to sharp pains, to feeling like my muscles are tearing. is this normal? is it just the feeling/sensations coming back?

Doctor Answers (3)

Delyaed onset of pain after tummy tuck

+1

You should truly be evaluated by a surgeon. This is highly uncommon after tummy tuck. I have seen this once when one of my patients gained a significant amount of weight straining the muscle diastasis repair. If weight gain is not your problem, you may want to consider an evaluation to make sure you do not have a hernia or other condition causing the delayed onset of pain.


Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 41 reviews

Pain after a tummy tuck

+1

Could be present 2 years after the procedure. There would also be nerve irritation to a nerve called the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve. To determine this, you need a doctor to look at you, otherwise, it is speculation. I hope this answer helps.

Srdjan Ostric, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon

Persistent Discomfort 2 years after a Tummy Tuck is not common

+1

Regarding: " Is It Common to Still Have Pain 2 Years After a Tummy Tuck
I occasionally still have pain in my stomach.. more like discomfort. it ranges from a burning feeling, to sharp pains, to feeling like my muscles are tearing. is this normal? is it just the feeling/sensations coming back
?"

Persistent discomfort 2 years after a Tummy Tuck is not common. Occasional discomfort after significant straining however may be seen but is rarely of permanent significance or concern. If you have any worry I suggest you see your surgeon.

Dr. Aldea

Peter A. Aldea, MD
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 58 reviews

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