Can Common Cold or Bacterial Infection Infect Chin Implant?

Hi, I am curious to know if any other sort of infection (viral or bacterial) can possibly infect the chin implant ? Also, are diabetes or high blood pressure patients more prone to chin implan infections ? Thanks

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Infection of chin implant

The chance of having an infection in the chin implant is extremely rare. We place patients on antibiotics prior to and directly after the surgery. A viral inflammation will not affect the chin implant. Other medical issues, such as diabetes or high blood pressure will not affect the chin implant procedure. This is done under local anesthesia with a small one-half inch incision placed in the submental area, not through the mouth.  


Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 62 reviews

How likely are chin implants to become infected?

Having recently reviewed the literature on this topic for a presentation, I can tell you that the risk of a chin implact becoming infected is low, less than one percent.  That said, most surgeons are very meticulous when placing any foreign material as an implant infection almost always will require removal of the implant.

Joseph Campanelli, MD
Minneapolis Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Implant Infections

Regarding: "Can Common Cold or Bacterial Infection Infect Chin Implant?
Hi, I am curious to know if any other sort of infection (viral or bacterial) can possibly infect the chin implant ? Also, are diabetes or high blood pressure patients more prone to chin implan infections ? Thanks
"

All man made implants (breast, chin, joints, etc) CAN be infected by bacterial infections elsewhere in the body. These infections are overwhelmingly bacterial and there are no reports of viral infections that I am familiar with. Diabetics may have a higher rate of infections than others, especially if uncontrolled but there is no evidence that those with high blood pressure have a higher risk for infection. Taking oral antibiotics before dental work or when suspecting a bacterial infection is a precaution worth taking.

Dr. Peter Aldea

Peter A. Aldea, MD
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 73 reviews

Chin implant infection

Any bacterial infection you have can travel to a surgical site or to an implant and cause it to become infected and require its removal.  Not with viral though.

Can Common Cold or Bacterial Infection Infect Chin Implant?

The answer is not really but the statistical significance is slightly higher with these queried medical issues. From MIAMI Dr. Darryl J. Blinski

Chin implant infection

Chin implant infections are rare but do happen and the ones to be concerned about are from bacteria.

Peter T. Truong, MD
Fresno Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Chin implant infections

Bacteria would infect the implant, vs. virus.  Any systemic disease has the potential to increase infection risks.

sek

Spread of an infection to a chin implant

Any diabetic, but particularly longstanding poorly controlled, patient  theoretically has a higher rate of implant infection due to mildy compromised immune system and vascularity. Theoretically bacteremic spread to a chin implant is possible but not likely.  

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 56 reviews

Infections in chin implants

Once your implants have stabilized a few weeks, it is rare, but possible to encounter a bacterial infection of the implant.  Diabetes may increase the risks along with other concommitant medical issues, although hypertension is not usually associated with infections directly.  Antibiotics can be effective, but many implant infections that don't improve with simple antibiotics will require removal to clear the infections.

Randy Wong, MD
Honolulu Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.