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Is It Possible to Combine Breast Lift, Thigh Lift & Tummy Tuck?

28 yr old female, with 3 children. I feel like I have a lot of excess skin in fat in my abdominal region. I am interested in a tummy tuck and inner thigh lift, as well as a breast lift. Is it possible to combine all 3 in my situation?

Doctor Answers (13)

Break up multiple procedures into separate surgeries

+2

Sabrina;

Thank you for your question. While it is possible to have all three procedures at once. Most surgeons would probably prefer to break them up into two separate surgeries. I would recommend the tummy tuck and breast lift in one procedure and do the thigh lift at a later time. Best wishes.


Columbus Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Breast Lift / Thigh Lift / Tummy Tuck all together

+1

Thank you for your question and photos.  I would recommend that you visit with board certified plastic surgeons who have experience with these specific procedures to discuss the procedures in detail. I would normally recommend that you break up the procedures into 2 stages for safety reasons. 

 

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 710 reviews

Combined procedures

+1

It would be safer and preferable to have two different surgeries.  I would recommend the breast lift and tummy tuck in one session and the thigh lift at a later date.  This will make for more reasonable operative times, easier recovery  and less risk for more serious complications like infections or DVT (blood clots in the legs)

Marialyn Sardo, MD
La Jolla Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

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Combining cosmetic surgery procedures

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I many cases you can technically combine procedures.  However, there are several issues to be aware of.  First, how long will the surgery take.  Not only for your health(DVT etc) but also surgeon fatigue.  Second, a more difficult recovery.  If you have an abdominoplasty and thigh lift jointly, then you have more difficulty moving about as both your abdomen/core and your legs will be in discomfort.

 

I personally would not perform an abdominoplasty and thigh lift at the same time.

Steven S. Carp, MD
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Thigh lift

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The answer is yes, but I don't recommend combining too many procedures.  You could do the abdomen (body lift, in your case) and a breast augmentation, but hold on the thigh lift for a second procedure.  It will be safer.

Shahin Javaheri, MD
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Comnbined proceedures

+1

Tummy tuck, breast lift and thigh lifts are often combined. The most important consideration is safety. After three hours the risks start to become real. Before that time the risk from anesthesia (minute per minute) is close to the risk taken driving at 55 miles per hour on any U.S. highway. If your surgeon is experienced enough to perform these surgeries in a pre-discussed pre-determined time frame then it's OK. If he or she can't, then staging them would be wiser. The key isn't speed, it's efficiency. I average one combined procedure a week, and my OR time is around 4 hours. So ask your Board Certified Plastic Surgeon how many of these combined procedure have you done, and how long will it take you to do it? Then decide whether to stage it or not.

Ayman Hakki, MD
Washington DC Plastic Surgeon
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Combination Procedures

+1

I have combined the procedures you mention before.  One issue that can arise with thigh lift is swelling in the upper thigh/groin area.  Its also more difficult to properly fit a garment comfortably.  However, you do not have a lot of excess thigh skin so this may be OK.

John LoMonaco, MD, FACS
Houston Plastic Surgeon
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Is it possible to do thigh lift, tummy tuck and breast lift at the same time?

+1

Combining surgical procedures increases surgical and anesthetic risks.  Bleeding, fluid and electrolyte imbalance, risk of blood clots, pain and limitations of ambulation are all concerns with doing too much surgery during one setting.  Although the operative time can be decreased with two surgical teams, the risks for multiple major surgeries are still present.  Healing is also more difficult so your recovery time would be significantly lengthened.  Be very careful about this decision.

Elizabeth S. Harris, MD
San Antonio Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Multiple simultaneous elective procedures

+1

Technically and practically it might be possible but your surgeon must take into consideration many factors including blood loss, post-op swelling and fluid requirements, anesthetic risks. post-op recovery requirements and difficulty. For example. early ambulation is very important after major procedures to prevent blood clots in the leg. Having the procedures you mention will all contribute to difficulty moving due to pain or limitation of use of upper arms. You also should consider the priority of your concerns. As a participant in the show "Extreme Makeover" in the early 2000's, we often pushed the envelop to do multiple procedure, but one factor I looked at including total surface area of operation was the length of the procedure being under 6-7 hours. It would appear that you should consider the abdomen and the breast and reserve the thighs for a secondary surgery unless the others took four hours or less.

Robin T. W. Yuan, M.D.

Robin T.W. Yuan, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Multiple Procedures at the Same Time

+1

While anything is possible, I would suggest doing your breast lift and abdominoplasty at one time and then concentrating on your back and thighs at another time.  You need extensive surgery, but you also want to be as safe as possible.  Separating the surgery into components as suggested may be the safest thing for you.

 

Good Luck.

David Shafer, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 56 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.