When is the Swelling from a BA Typically Gone?

It's been almost a month since my BA and I am wondering if am still swollen? I have not changed at all in a good week if not more. Pain is gone and it looks like my breasts are healed wonderfully. I have noticed no changes. Is swelling typically gone by this point in time?

Doctor Answers (9)

Swelling After Breast Enhancement

+2

Usually, most of the swelling resolves within a few weeks following a breast augmentation. It may take several more weeks 6-8 for everything to settle down to its natural position. By 3 months most patients do not have the feeling of an implant. In other words, their breasts feel like any other part of the body, where they are not conscious about it.


Munster Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 25 reviews

Swelling post breast augmentation

+2

Following breast augmentation swelling will usually be gone after 6 weeks.  In some cases it may take longer and depends on the technique of the surgery and the degree of manipulation of the natural tissue - more surgery means more swelling.

Jeremy Hunt

Jeremy Hunt, MBBS, FRACS
Sydney Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 54 reviews

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BREAST AUGMENTATION - SWELLING? GONE?

+2

EACH patient again, is very different.  We like to think one month but it depends on the color of the incision usually...this is a good indicator that healing is still going on.  

Be patient and try not to over-do, as we all know rest and post op care is essential.  

Guillermo Koelliker, MD
Mexico Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Swelling

+2

Swelling should subside within the first month, however, increased level of activity can cause swelling to manifest itself even after 1 month post-op-see your doctor if this is a continued concern of yours

Edward J. Bednar, MD
Charlotte Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 35 reviews

What we usually consider "swelling" is gone by 1 month post-op in most cases

+2

Most of the time what we normally think of as swelling, that is doughy fluid in the tissues, is resolved by 1 month after the surgery.  However, that does not mean your breasts won't continue to change subtly for the next couple of months or so.  The tissues will continue to soften as they accommodate to the implant, and they will relax a little, making the breasts more supple and mobile.  This is a good thing, and it has become known on the street as "drop and fluff."  Usually at a month the breasts are still a little tight and a little firm, and they will need another 2 to 3 months to reach their final state.  The scars may take up to 9 months or a year to fully mature as well.  These are general guidelines, and everybody is different.  Some heal faster and some heal slower, and healing is a continuous process.  There is no defined point of demarcation between different stages of healing; one just kind of leads into the next until one day, the process is complete.  Sounds like things are going as they should for you.  Good luck.

 

Joseph L. Grzeskiewicz, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

When is the Swelling from a BA Typically Gone?

+2

The majority of the swelling is gone within a month or so. There is normally a small amount of residual swelling for up to six months. 

James E. Murphy, MD, FACS
Reno Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

The color of the incision is a good barometer for swelling in a breast augmentation.

+2

If you're wondering about persistent swelling after any operation look at the incision. If it still has color meaning red or pink and biologic activity is still ongoing which include swelling.

Vincent N. Zubowicz, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Breast Augmentation

+1

It can take anywhere from 6 weeks to 6 months for most of the swelling to resolve.

Best,

Asif Pirani, MD, FRCS(C)
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.