Ask a doctor

Co2 Laser resurfacing: Dermatologist or Plastic Surgeon or GP with cosmetic training?

Hello! I am a 33 yr old female with moderate acne scarring and chickenpox scars on my face. I am interested in laser resurfacing and would most likely have co2 or fraxel re:pair or some combination of these. I live in Australia (Brisbane) and my question is: would it be better to see a dermatologist or plastic surgeon or a GP trained in cosmetic procedures? My concern is quality not cost. Thank you :-)

Doctor Answers (2)

Who to see for full face co2 resurfacing

+3

Ideally, you want to have your procedure performed by a specialist who has performed many of these procedures during their training so that they can manage not only the procedure itself but can potentially handle any post operative issues that may arise and properly screen you for the procedure before you have it done.

Dermatologists and plastic surgeons are generally those who have this experience. Ask them key questions such as: may you take a look at their before and after photos? How many do they perform in a year? What training have they had? How accessible will they be during the recovery period? What portion of their practice is dedicated to cosmetic work?

And if you aren't sure, it doesn't hurt to have a few consultations with different doctors. You will get a sense for who you feel most comfortable with as well as their staff.


Seattle Dermatologist
4.5 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Who to do CO2 laser

+2
  1. As a plastic surgeon, I prefer plastic surgeons,
  2. but a good GP with cosmetic training is better than a plastic surgeon or dermatologist not interested in lasers,
  3. Ask around and consider the professional with the best reputation.

Elizabeth Morgan, MD, PhD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.