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Missing First Molar, Can the Space be Closed with Damon Braces?

I have missing both down first molars from 10 years, last year after dental work on 5 teeth on the right side i my teeth start to move and my bite was damaged. i think that my down jaw was some how put a little bit back and that is what caused all the shifting. I noticed shifting of my teeth 2 weeks after. So my q is can the space be closed with Damon braces(my wisdom teeth is not removed).Idid consultation with damon ortho and she sad that she can try.I can post picture of my teeth if needed

Doctor Answers (5)

Closing a first molar space

+2

It will be necessary to make a full comrehensive treatment plan regarding what other things need to be done but I do think it may be possible to close the molar spaces in the lower using T.A.D.s which are small temporary anchors in the bone to help pull the other molars forward.  Do not have the third molars removed as they may be able to be brought forward also.  I have been able to close some pretty large lower molar spaces using this method.  We do use Damon braces with the T.A.D.s also.


Phoenix Orthodontist

Damon Braces, Closing teeth, TADs

+2

Closing space on the lower arch is possible with the addition of TADs (temporary anchorage device).  This allows absolute anchorage to allow protraction of the posterior teeth.  I have attached a video that will show a little more in depth the technology that we are utilizing in our office to accomplish this.  The Damon System's minimal friction allows the space to close more easily.

Ron D. Wilson, DMD
Gainesville Orthodontist

You Can Close a Space with All Types of Braces

+1

You can absolutely close a space from a missing first molar with Damon Braces, and you can do it with other types of braces too.

What you may need is a TAD (Temporary Anchorage Device), which is a small pin inserted into your gums to help pull teeth in the right direction so the spaces close in the right direction.

Scott Frey, DDS
Allentown Orthodontist

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Closing Molar Spaces with Damon Braces

+1

I am a Damon certified provider and love the system. There are lots of reasons why I believe that Damon brackets are better than others on the market. I do not believe that you can move teeth any better with them than anything else however. The teeth and bones don't know the difference. All they can do is sense that there is force. Closing a space where a molar  has been missing for 10 years will be very difficult. Not only is it the size of two bicuspids, the bone in that area has probably changed so that the teeth will move more slowly. It narrows and becomes "hour glass" shaped. Using temporary anchors would be an option, but the time involved would take four times longer than closing a single bicuspid extraction space. (Twice as long because the space is twice as big, times two again because all of the space closure would have to come just from the molar moving forward and none from the other teeth moving back.) It would be in your best interest to consult with a board-certified prosthodontist about having the teeth replaced by either bridges or implants. Good luck!

Greg Jorgensen, DMD, MS
Albuquerque Orthodontist

Closing lower first Molar space

+1

It is very hard to close a lower first molar space in many cases whether using Damon or other types of braces.  It depends on your age and your bone morphology.  If the bone has shrung where the teeth were lost then it can be very difficult.  THe procedure can be aided by surgical procedures.  Most likely it will be successful with the aid of surgery.  AN implant may be a more cost effective and quicker alternative to replace the missing teeth.  Usually without surgical help it is difficult to close the space entirely.

 

Lawrence Singer, DMD
Washington Cosmetic Dentist
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.