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How Much Work Could Be Done with Closed Rhinoplasty?

I was wondering what could be done only with closed rhinoplasty and not open rhinoplasty? (a longer recovery time period does not fit in well for me)? The hump on the bridge of my nose is one thing I would like changing and maybe a narrower tip (especially if the bridge would be thinner due to the hump reduction and then look out of place). How possible would good results be discounting open rhinoplasty? In an ideal world I wouldn't mind but again, the recovery period is one of my major issues in deciding. Thanks.

Doctor Answers (13)

Open versus closed rhinoplasty

+3

If you are planning to have tip work done, you are probably better off having an open rhinoplasty. Yes, the swelling persists longer than a closed rhinoplasty.  Remember that a rhinoplasty will last a lifetime, so don't you want it done with the most precision that you can get?


Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

How Much Work Could Be Done with Closed Rhinoplasty?

+2

I would not be concerned with techniques of open vs. closed as much as the skill of your surgeon.  In your case, whether I did closed or open, I would address your mid nasal vault by putting cartilage batten grafts to prevent future collapse (an inverted V deformity) after hump removal.  We can show you pictures of both open and closed rhinoplasties a week to ten days later that looked fantastic.  

Ramtin Kassir, MD
New York Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

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Open Versus Closed Rhinoplasty -- Surgeon's Experience is More Important

+2

While many patient's may have a preference for one approach versus the other, your surgeon will recommend the approach that he or she feels is most appropriate, and the surgical technique employed depends primarily on the goals established by you and your surgeon. Some surgeons perform exclusively closed rhinoplasty while others prefer open rhinoplasty. There are surgeons who perform both types of rhinoplasty depending on the patient's needs.

In the end, the most important factor that affects the success of the rhinoplasty is the surgeon's experience.

C. Spencer Cochran, MD
Dallas Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 91 reviews

All work can be done with closed rhinoplasty

+2

The same techniques can be performed with both an open or closed rhinoplasty. The only exception is in a closed rhinoplasty the incision is not made across the columella. Tip cartilage grafting techniques, refinement of the entire nasal tip, hump removal of bridge, and narrowing of the sidewalls is easily accomplished through a closed rhinoplasty technique. There is less swelling and edema and a lack of the incision across the columella with a closed rhinoplasty.

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 57 reviews

Open versus closed rhinoplasty

+2

Your concerns can definitely be addressed with a closed rhinoplasty. Major tip work and significant reductions in the dorsal hump area of the nose usually require the open approach. Nontheless, if your surgeon does need to convert to an open rhinoplasty the added incisions heal remarkably well. Good luck!

Jeffrey E. Schreiber, MD
Baltimore Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 69 reviews

Nose jobs: open or closed rhinoplasty?

+2

It appears that your nose could be managed using a closed approach. Both the tip and the hump could be managed in this fashion. Open rhinoplasty is generally better for complex nasal surgery or for secondary rhinoplasty.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

Most people only need closed rhinoplasty.

+2

Hi!

1) From your pictures, closed rhinoplasty is all you need. It has no scar and quicker recovery, and open rhinoplasty would not give you a better result.

2) I have noticed that younger or less experienced surgeons only do open rhinoplasty, because you can see the cartilages and it is easier if you are not totally at home with the anatomy. But most people don't need it.

George J. Beraka, MD (retired)
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Downtime is Minimal after Open Rhinoplasty.

+2

After your Rhinoplasty surgery, you'll be on house rest for one week. Your dressing is removed around 7 days after surgery, and your nose will look a bit swollen, and you may have bruising under your eyes. I advise against strenuous activity till 3 weeks after surgery, and then there are no restrictions.

I've attached a link to my Rhinoplasty photos for your perusal. I show several early photos at 3 weeks following surgery, and you'll see that there is no obvious evidence of surgery at that time. Most folks go back to work 10 to 14 days following surgery.

Almost all of the nose-jobs I perform is via the open approach. It allows for excellent visualization and restructuring of the underlying nasal framework. In my hands, open Rhinoplasty typically leads to results that exceed my patient's expectations. The open Rhinoplasty technique I use was learned during my fellowship in Advanced Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery over 10 years ago, and it has been a reliable method of addressing most cosmetic and functional nasal issues.

The certification, experience, and results of your Rhinoplasty surgeon are the most important factors. So go on several consultations, and choose carefully before proceeding.

Good luck, and best regards.

Eric M. Joseph, MD
West Orange Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 276 reviews

You should have excellent results with a closed rhinoplasty.

+1

I have been doing open rhinoplasty for more that 30 years. However, I still do many noses using the closed technique. Your tip does not appear to need very much work if any. See an experienced rhinoplasty surgeon and you should be able to have this done closed. 

Toby Mayer, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.