What is This Clear Jelly-like Mucous in my Eye After a Lower Bleph 7 Days Ago? Should I Be Concern? (photo)

Doctor Answers (5)

Hello

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What you are describing is completely normal after blepharoplasty. Make sure you follow up with your plastic surgeon everything looks normal.


San Diego Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Chemosis after lower blepharoplasty

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What you are describing is called chemosis, which is swelling/fluid underneath the conjunctiva, which is the covering of the eyeball.  It is common after any eyelid but usually it is mild.  You should your surgeon or an ophthalmologist or oculoplastic surgeon.  There are things that you may need to do to improve the situation.  Rarely, the problem does not go away easily and other surgical manuevers may be necessary but don't worry about that at this time.

Mehryar (Ray) Taban, MD, FACS
Beverly Hills Oculoplastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Chemosis will go away

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Do not worry, that is swelling of the lining of the eye (the conjunctiva) and it will go away soon. Sometimes steroid eyedrops can help it. There may also be some bleeding  there which could spread and make the white part of they eye look red for a while. That will go away too.

Jeffrey Schiller, MD
Staten Island Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

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Swelling after lower eyelid blepharoplasty

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From that photo seven days after your lower eyelid surgery, it appears that you have a bit of swelling of the conjunctiva (the outer lining of the eye). We call this swelling "chemosis". It will usually resolve with a little bit of time, and sometimes some steroid drops to the eyes will help it to go down faster.

I would certainly recommend that you speak to your surgeon about it, but expect that there will be no longterm impact on the outcome of your blepharoplasty. 

Jamil Asaria, MD

FACE Cosmetic Surgery

Toronto, Canada

Jamil Asaria, MD
Toronto Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 45 reviews

Swelling will resolve

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Tithe condition is called chemosis and in almost all cases resolves with time and lubrications such as artificial tears.   I would schedule a follow up with your surgeon over the next few weeks

Jeffrey Joseph, MD, FACS
Lafayette Facial Plastic Surgeon

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.