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My Chin Implant is Out of Place - Can I Fix it w/o Surgery?

I had a chin implant 2 years ago and it is not fitted properly in the pocket. I've started to notice it in pictures and if it hits the light in a certain way. I went to my doctor and he told me to push on the implant, and that the pocket will stretch and the implant will move into the right position. Does this sound right? Or does it need to be fixed with surgery?

Doctor Answers (13)

Massaging chin implant to reposition it

+1

This far out from surgery it's not very likely that massaging your chin implant will move it.

I suspect that you may need to have a revision procedure to re-insert it or place a different size implant.


Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Chin implant malposition

+1

If the implant position is really bothering you, then you will likely need surgical correction.  Massaging the implant will not likely worsen the situation but may not improve it.

Samer W. Cabbabe, MD, FACS
Saint Louis Plastic Surgeon
3.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

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Repositioning chin implant requires surgery

+1

The only way to fix a displaced chin implant is to remove it and reinsert it. This can be done under local anesthesia. It is also important to note whether the implant is the appropriate size for the patient. If not, then it will need to be replaced with one that will fit better with the patient’s anatomy.  

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 54 reviews

Chin Implant Revision Surgery

+1

At two years post op it is highly unlikely that any sort of massage techniques will help to realign your implant.  The implant is placed in a very precise pocket along the chin and jawline.  If dissection of the pocket is performed incorrectly implant can appear misaligned.  At his point I feel that your only option is surgery if you are looking to revise positioning.  Good Luck......Dr. Corrado

Anthony Corrado, DO
Philadelphia Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Asymmetrical Chin Implant

+1

You implant is likely made of a silicone polymer. It is very unlikely that you will have any success in changing it's position after two years. I believe that you will need surgery to correct it.

Mark Preston, MD
Columbus Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Change in chin implant position usually not correctible without surgery

+1

Hi there-

I don't believe that pushing on your implant will achieve correction.

You are going to need a surgical procedure if correcting this is important to you.

Armando Soto, MD
Orlando Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 95 reviews

Unlikely that massage will reposition a chin implant 2 years after surgery

+1

It is highly unlikely that massage will reposition a chin implant 2 years after surgery. However, there is no risk of this causing any harm. If this does not work, I would recommend returning to your surgeon for a revision. If they are not able or interested in helping you, please find an experienced plastic surgeon to do your revision surgery.

Best,

Stephen Weber MD, FACS

Stephen Weber, MD, FACS
Denver Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 34 reviews

Moving and implant into place

+1

I do not believe that pushing on the implant will cause it to shift within the fibrous tissue pocket or capsule

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 41 reviews

Chin implants usually don't move after 2 years

+1

Occasionally, chin implants do not seat correctly on the anterior jawbone. This abnormality can become more obvious over time, as the swelling slowly subsides. Usually the tissue surrounding the implant either grows into the implant or forms a capsule around it (depending of the implant material). The implant could be dislodged with severe trauma or impact, but I think unlikely to move just with manual pressure. I would consider having it re-positioned.

Theda C. Kontis, MD
Baltimore Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.